#1440 The Future is Now

All the Best producer Joel Carnegie got strapped into a bionic ear, which, to be honest, we thought was still part of the future instead of part of the present.
That got us thinking – what else seems to be firmly in the future, with flying cars and space highways? What stuff exists that makes the present feel like history?
In this episode of All the Best, the future is now.
We watch robots fight it out on a battlefield, and take sides. We delve into the world of bionics, and we go out on a canoe with people who are already being affected by climate change.
Benevolent Robots 
Pip visited Macquarie University with a friend to watch a robot competition. At first she thought it was going to be like that old tv show where robots would fight in a ring. But turns out these robots weren’t made for miniature battles with stabbing arms and flame throwers. No no, they were much more important – robots to plant and sow seeds for farms.
Produced by Pip Rasmussen
Bionic Ear
There’s a place in Melbourne called The Bionics Institute. They’ve researched the brain and found that hearing loss is plays a huge role in cognitive decline, meaning, memory and ability to pay attention and multitask. so they decided to fix it. Joel Carnegie got hooked up to some machines in the name of radio and science to bring us this story of the bionic ear.
Produced by Joel Carnegie

Rising tides
While we debate whether climate change is happening, whether it’s our fault, and what we should do about it, for some people climate change isn’t a theory, or even part of a theoretical future. It’s real and now and part of their lives. Josie Wright spent a weekend in Newcastle with the Pacific Warriors, for whom a climate change affected future is all too..present.
Produced by Josie Wright and Selena Shannon

Presenters:  Pip Rasmussen & Michael Brydon

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: 350.org

#1439 West Writers Group

West Writers Group is a collective of writers from diverse backgrounds who currently live, work or have other established links to Melbourne’s West. It is a collective that will amplify the stories and voices of Melbourne’s West.

For the past few months All the Best producers have teamed up with some of the West Writers Group to bring you the stories in this week’s episode.

Emotions bubble to the surface, for better and for worse. Two characters swap anonymous notes, and another dwells on some terrible news. And there’s a toaster, but it’ll only communicate with Simon.

 

Control Your Emotions

People always say ‘you must control your emotions’. Why?

Written and performed by Latifa Elmrini
Produced by Harriet Conron
Music Credits: ‘Urban Tropic (Pt. ii)’ by Cosmic Analog Ensemble

 

Against Progress

The invention of the smartphone fundamentally changed the dynamics of Western society. The summer of 2000 can be easily seen as the last time we were truly alone. The last decade has made us open up like a shell, we suffer from emotional spillage, fast-food intelligence -we’re glued to the device that’s fundamentally changing our fabric of life.

Inspired by an encounter with a guy who missed his train at Parliament Station one night because he was on his phone, this poem voices the concerns we all have with this age but can’t seem the shake off because this is the future we have made for ourselves.

We love it but hate it because of the changes its creating in our lives too.

To add to the hypocrisy, the entire piece is written on an iPHONE too. So it’s completely mobile written – an on-the-go poem.

Written and performed by Ennis Cehic
Produced by Leona Hameed
Music Credits: Seekae – Void

 

Ninian, an excerpt from The Whitlow

This is an excerpt from Bob Carey-Grieve’s novel in progress called The Whitlow. The novel’s conceit is that the characters are all drawn loosely on Catholic Saints. Bob takes details from the recorded history of their lives, their nationality, patronage etcetera, and reimagines them in the contemporary setting of a Gippsland lawn bowling community. When a prized meat tray is stolen, the community has to come to terms with some of it’s darker secrets. The excerpt presented here introduces the central character of Ninian, and how his journey begins.

Written and performed by Bob Carey-Grieve
Produced by Philippe Perez
Music Credits:

 

Hidden Drawer

14 years ago, Imbi Neeme was having coffee in a London cafe when she found a hidden drawer in the table she sitting at that was filled with anonymous notes. She wrote her own note and put it inside – and has wondered ever since if anyone read it and what they thought.

From this experience, an idea for a story grew. Imbi is currently writing a novel in which two complete strangers each discover a hidden drawer in a West Footscray cafe and slowly get to know each other – and themselves – through the notes they leave for each other. This soundscape contains some of the notes they exchange.

Written and performed by Imbi Neeme
Production and Sound Design by Derek McCormack
Performed by Jane Rawson and Tim Stitz

 

The Toaster

Where do you find meaning? Everyone has to find it somewhere.

In this sharehouse, meaning is found in the messages that comes from the Toaster. The lives of the housemates and dynamics of the household revolve around what can be divined from white bread.

James say’s that people have thought this story is about everything from technology to cults but the only thing we’re certain of is that it’s not about toast. Or is it?
Written and performed by James Robertson Hirst
Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Presenter: Michael Brydon & Pip Rasmussen

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

 

Image Credit: Nour Abouzeid

#1438 Grief Part 2

Most of us will grieve for someone or something at some point in our lives, but it’s strange and hard to talk about. Feelings of grief are hard to think about, let alone say out loud.

This week on All the Best, you’ll be hearing part two of our exploration of Grief. We’re hitting the like button under things that make us devastated, we’re speeding to funerals and taking selfies with the casket.
We’ll be thinking about death in all the wrong ways – because no one has figured out the right way yet.

 

Eterni.me 
“What if you could be remembered forever?” is the slogan of beta program Eterni.me. But what are the consequences of being remembered forever? What does it mean for the people doing the remembering?
Pip speaks to writer Gillian Terzis about the new technology. You can read Gillian’s feature on the subject in the Saturday Paper here.

 

Speeding in July
While putting this episode together we realised that death can make you think about yourself, just as much as the person who has passed away. It forces introspection, pullin your insecurities into sharp focus. 

This memoir was first published on Scum Mag.
Written and performed by James Butler
Produced by  Sky Kirkham

 

Grief without Death
When someone looses a child it’s kind of expected that they will grieve, and hopefully some sort of closure is found. Jessica Bineth wanted to know what the grieving process was like when you’ve lost a child, but they’re still alive.
She spoke to Laurence Anderson, Project Manager at Dads In Distress, a support group for men dealing with the break up of their family and Terry, who who became a member at Dads In Distress a few years ago following his own divorce and now facilitates group meetings in Melbourne.
Produced by Jessica Bineth
Music Credits: Caitlin Park

Presenters:   Pip Rasmussen & Michael Brydon 

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Tjukka2

 

#1437 Grief Part 1

Most of us will grieve for someone or something at some point in our lives, but it’s strange and hard to talk about. Feelings of grief are hard to think about, let alone say out loud.
This week on All the Best, you’ll be hearing part one of our exploration of grief. We’ll be treading that fine line between tribute and sentimentality, between feelings and what we’re expected to feel.
We’ll be thinking about death in all the wrong ways – because no one has figured out the right way yet.

 

Bagpipes
“They’ve got a very unique sound and some say you either love them all you hate them but people tell me when I’m playing them particularly at funerals.”
Donald Blair is pip major of the Warnabool Pipe Band, a retired dairy farmer, and played bagpipes at Michael’s grandad’s funeral.
What is it about some things – sounds, smells, music, that just brings on grief?
Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Care
Mum had grown tired, so I tried flooding the basement. I put Mr Zorro, her axolotl, into the water with her and she seemed happy. This piece was first published by Seizure.
Written and read by Paul Dalla Rosa
Sound by Jess O’Callaghan
Music Credits: ‘Glass Piano’ by Podington Bear

 

My Mother Told Me
What does grief look like to a child?
Written and produced by Selina Springett
Original music by Stephen Vitiello
Music Credits: ‘Lulu’ by Stephen Vitiello

 

Remembering Mum
This story was first broadcast on All the Best in 2012 as part of the episode #1235 A Few Of Our Favourite Things. How to you get to know someone when they’re not around? Before social media, it was through sheer detective work – asking questions, looking at old photographs, reading anything they’ve written or left behind. In the case of her mother, Madelyne Cummings’ own search led her to discoveries she could treasure forever.

Written and read by Madelyne Cummings
Produced by Que Minh Luu
Original music by Jamieson Shaw
Technical production by Antonia Gauci

 

Presenter: Michael Brydon & Pip Rasmussen

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Workers Party of Ireland