#1520 Go Play Outside

Do you remember climbing a tree as a kid? Running through the bush in the dark, feeling leaves and twigs crunch beneath your feet, your torch out of battery? Did you leap up to grab at the monkey bars even though your arms were too short to make it?

It seems that in a few generations, everything about childhood has changed – except kids themselves. The risks of play, letting kids go it alone, and unsupervised activity of any kind are more publicised than ever. Things that were free fun are now controlled, monetized experienced. Toys that once were bears and dolls are Disney designed icons to be collected and discarded.

How are the changes to play impacting kids? How are they changing the stories kids grow up to tell? And could the changes have a long term impact on health or the environment?

This week on All the Best – stories that explore the commercialisation of play, from mass-made toys to ‘tree-based eco adventures’.

Thanks to the Kids in Nature Network for having our producers along at Nature Play Week.

 

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: David Baker

#1519 War Stories

When we sent troops to fight in World War I the federated Australia was 13 years old. We thought we were invincible and we had something to prove, like most 13 year olds do.
At the end of World War II we still didn’t know who we were. We clung to the idyllic myth of the ANZAC, the idea that we were forged in war, and in that moment, we gave up on the idea of being who we wanted to be and doing it on our own.
In this episode of All the Best, we tell tales from war.
Roy Mundine
Battles were fought and still are fought in this country against discrimination and racism. But when our indigenous soldiers went away they found that war doesn’t discriminate. Bullets go through black skin just the same as white. The playing field was levelled. Until their return and a new fight begans for recognition as protectors of their country.Producer Liam Knierim has created a series of interviews with aboriginal war veterans. Here he speaks to Roy Mundine, a Bundjalung Man who served in the Vietnam War as a Warrant Officer Class One.You can hear more of Liam’s interviews with Aboriginal War Veterans at the Knierim Brothers Youtube channel.
Produced by Liam Knierim
Dame Alice Chisolm
What do you know about your Great-Great Grandmother? Producer Angus Thompson didn’t know much, until one day when his dad handed him a book about her war-time adventures. Here, he looks into the unusual life of an extraordinary woman.
Produced by Angus Thompson

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

 

#1518 Ayahuasca

Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic brew historically and traditionally used by shamans in the Amazon basin to gain access to the spirit world. In the past decade more and more tourists are travelling to Peru to drink ayahuasca in hopes of having an enlightening experience. But what does it mean when a cultural practice is commodified and packaged for tourists?

In this episode of All the Best, producer Lily Ainsworth explores the world of ayahuasca, and the Australians who seek it.

 

Episode Producer: Lily Ainsworth

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit:  Terpiscore 

Music Credits: 

#1517 The Sea Told Slant

 

“While I was listening for what wasn’t being said about the boats that weren’t being talked about, I also begun to pay attention to those that were. Boats that went down in Uganda, Bangladesh, South Korea, in lakes, oceans and rivers. Cruises, tankers, yachts and ferries.”

For centuries, the sea has inspired stories. Songs, sailors tales, mermaid legends. This week on All the Best, we tell stories of the sea that diver deeper.

Seagull Girl

Jacqueline Breen ended up in Broken Hill, About 1100kms away from the sea side. When she got there, she found some other sea lovers away from the waves. She asks Sean Dooley, editor of Birdlife Australia, how the gulls ended up in Broken Hill, and where they might have gone.

Produced by Jacqueline Breen

The Boat

While the government maintained silence on the boats of asylum seekers arriving in Australia, and made it harder for information about them to be reported, Rebecca Giggs began to pay attention to the boats that were being talked about. Boats that went down in Uganda, Bangladesh, South Korea, in lakes, oceans and rivers.

This piece was first published by Right Now, as part of their essay series which is funded by the Australian Government through the Australia Council. You can read more of the series here.

Written and performed by Rebecca Giggs

Edited by Roselina Press

Produced by Heidi Pett

Keep Moving

There are some things we take for granted, and sight is definitely one of them. It’s hard to appreciate how incredible it is unless it starts to fade away. For Dane, a 21 year old living on the northern beaches of Sydney this happened gradually but surely. Aidan Molins talked to him about his experience with Lebers Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

Produced by Aidan Molins

Featuring Craig Coventry

 

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: Chris Betcher