#1705 Repeated Collision

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We’re dipping into our archives this week to bring you two stories of forces coming together, like a hard wooden cricket bat and a mouth full of baby teeth, or our first story, which takes place on the frontline of a battle between two passionate groups in duck hunting season.

‘Duck Season’ by Leona Hameed [repeat]

Every year on the same day, duck hunters and duck protectors face-off on a lake. It’s the opening day of duck hunting season, and neither group is leaving until they’ve got what they came for.

Originally broadcast in 2015.

Music: With Stars for Eyes by h+, Black Lake by Real Estate, Inner Lakes by North Hive and Submerging Blue Black by Podington Bear

‘Like Strawberries’ by Zacha Rosen [repeat]

The most important thing Michael owned, apart from his collection, was his toy cricket bat. Most parents would give their children a plastic one, but Michael’s mum and dad were completists. They’d very carefully looked for a replica ashes cricket bat. But, more importantly, it was made of some very hard wood.

This fiction piece was written and produced by Zacha Rosen.

Originally broadcast in 2015

Music: Hooghly Night Patrol by The Bombay Royale, Ewok feast/part of the tribe (medley) by John Williams, Nasty Sex by La Revolucion De Emiliano Zapata, Suco de Tangerina  by Beastie Boys

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Executive Producer: Selena Shannon

Vic state coordinator: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

SYN production manager: Beth Gibson

Community Coordinator: Chloe Gillespie

Host: Jessica Hamilton

Episode Compiler: Tegan Nicholls

Image by creative commons user Sharyn Morrow

#1538 Taking The Law Into Your Own Hands

Duck Season
On the opening weekend of the duck hunting season two groups of people converge on a lake in rural Victoria. Each believes in their cause so passionately that they wake up at 4 in the morning to wade into icy water and stand there for hours. Half of them shoot the native wildlife, and the other half get in the way.
Produced by Leona Hameed
Music: With Stars for Eyes by h+, Black Lake by Real Estate, Inner Lakes by North Hive and  Submerging Blue Black by Podington Bear
Jailbreak
Produced by Tiger Webb
The Cairo Citizen’s Police
Produced by Kim Tan

Features Executive Producer: Heidi Pett

Melbourne State Coordinator: Bethany Atkinson­-Quinton

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Community Coordinator: Aidan Molins

SYN Production Manager: Bec Fary

Episode image: Leona Hameed

#1526 Be Strong and Have Courage

“I remember in year 7 especially feeling really different from everyone, classic, and I remember feeling like there was a space where I was more myself than I could be at school.”
That place is Hashomer Hatzair, or ‘Hashy,’ a Jewish Socialist Zionist youth movement where producer Hannah Reich spent 10 years as a student and 2 years as a leader. But lately, her beloved movement has been struggling to find traction and children. It’s struggling to survive.
Hannah spoke with her friends who grew up in the movement to remind herself of what exactly what so unique about the time they spent there and then went back to summer camp, 5 years after leaving Hashy.
She recorded the sounds and ruach of camp and tried to understand the crisis that the leaders must overcome so that Hashy can be around for her kids.

Hannah
would like to thank the entire Hashy community past and present (in particular the 2014/2015 mazkirut), the Blay Family, her kvutza, her parents, Jess Leski and Ellie Kulas.
Episode Producer: Hannah Reich
Supervising Producers: Leona Hameed and Michael Brydon

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: Hannah Reich

#1501 Islands

The weather is warm, the sky is blue, and you have to go back to work.

Look, we agree, it sucks. This week we’ll try and drag the holiday out a bit longer, and take you on an island holiday. Three, in fact.

We’ll take you south to South-Western Victoria, to a tall, flat island with a pretty scary story behind it. We’ll head up north, to the bottom of the Great Barrier Reef, and climb up into a haunted lighthouse. We’ll take you to an island right in the heart of Melbourne…although it’s probably not the sort of island you’re imagining relaxing on.

This week on All the Best, – islands. Their stories, their histories, and their ghosts.

 

Deen Maar

As kids, Michael and his brother used to look out to the horizon off the coast of South-Western Victoria and on a clear day they could see it. A tall, flat island that we were told had a pretty scary story behind it. Here, he talks to Joel Wright about Deen Maar.

Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Lady Elliott Island

There’s an island at the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef, 45 hectares of land surrounded by the sea. Lady Elliot Island is an idyllic resort location, but not all of the residents sleep peacefully. In 1907, Susannah Mckee, the wife of the lighthouse keeper was found dead by her husband, and even now some of the resort’s employees claim that Susannah still haunts the grounds where she once lived. But why would Susannah be unable to rest? Rose Lane set out to investigate.

Story and narration: Rose Lane

Additional voice: Eoin Clements

Editing and Supervising Production: Sky Kirkham

Music Credits:

Lighthouse by Grouper

The great hidden sea of the unconscious by The Caretaker

Out to Sea by Olafur Arnalds

Ghost of Me by Shaula

Bluebeard 6 by Danny Norbury

 

Coode Island

Picture an Island. What do you see? It’s probably by itself, away from civilization, untouched by man. it has waves gently lapping at the shore with palm trees bordering a thick jungle. This story is not about that island.

Produced by Laura Kewley

Supervising Producer: Leona Hameed

Music Credits:

Nostalgia of an Ex-Gangsta-Rapper by Deef

 

Presenters:  Pip Rasmussen & Michael Brydon

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Paul D’Ambra 

#1439 West Writers Group

West Writers Group is a collective of writers from diverse backgrounds who currently live, work or have other established links to Melbourne’s West. It is a collective that will amplify the stories and voices of Melbourne’s West.

For the past few months All the Best producers have teamed up with some of the West Writers Group to bring you the stories in this week’s episode.

Emotions bubble to the surface, for better and for worse. Two characters swap anonymous notes, and another dwells on some terrible news. And there’s a toaster, but it’ll only communicate with Simon.

 

Control Your Emotions

People always say ‘you must control your emotions’. Why?

Written and performed by Latifa Elmrini
Produced by Harriet Conron
Music Credits: ‘Urban Tropic (Pt. ii)’ by Cosmic Analog Ensemble

 

Against Progress

The invention of the smartphone fundamentally changed the dynamics of Western society. The summer of 2000 can be easily seen as the last time we were truly alone. The last decade has made us open up like a shell, we suffer from emotional spillage, fast-food intelligence -we’re glued to the device that’s fundamentally changing our fabric of life.

Inspired by an encounter with a guy who missed his train at Parliament Station one night because he was on his phone, this poem voices the concerns we all have with this age but can’t seem the shake off because this is the future we have made for ourselves.

We love it but hate it because of the changes its creating in our lives too.

To add to the hypocrisy, the entire piece is written on an iPHONE too. So it’s completely mobile written – an on-the-go poem.

Written and performed by Ennis Cehic
Produced by Leona Hameed
Music Credits: Seekae – Void

 

Ninian, an excerpt from The Whitlow

This is an excerpt from Bob Carey-Grieve’s novel in progress called The Whitlow. The novel’s conceit is that the characters are all drawn loosely on Catholic Saints. Bob takes details from the recorded history of their lives, their nationality, patronage etcetera, and reimagines them in the contemporary setting of a Gippsland lawn bowling community. When a prized meat tray is stolen, the community has to come to terms with some of it’s darker secrets. The excerpt presented here introduces the central character of Ninian, and how his journey begins.

Written and performed by Bob Carey-Grieve
Produced by Philippe Perez
Music Credits:

 

Hidden Drawer

14 years ago, Imbi Neeme was having coffee in a London cafe when she found a hidden drawer in the table she sitting at that was filled with anonymous notes. She wrote her own note and put it inside – and has wondered ever since if anyone read it and what they thought.

From this experience, an idea for a story grew. Imbi is currently writing a novel in which two complete strangers each discover a hidden drawer in a West Footscray cafe and slowly get to know each other – and themselves – through the notes they leave for each other. This soundscape contains some of the notes they exchange.

Written and performed by Imbi Neeme
Production and Sound Design by Derek McCormack
Performed by Jane Rawson and Tim Stitz

 

The Toaster

Where do you find meaning? Everyone has to find it somewhere.

In this sharehouse, meaning is found in the messages that comes from the Toaster. The lives of the housemates and dynamics of the household revolve around what can be divined from white bread.

James say’s that people have thought this story is about everything from technology to cults but the only thing we’re certain of is that it’s not about toast. Or is it?
Written and performed by James Robertson Hirst
Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Presenter: Michael Brydon & Pip Rasmussen

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

 

Image Credit: Nour Abouzeid

#1431 Cities You’ll Never See On Screen

“If we are going to create  a better future for ourselves the people who are going to show us how to do it are those people who are working in the crazy spaces.”

New York, LA, Tokyo. We see cities destroyed all the time in film, TV and in books. But how often does the apocalypse come home to Australia? And what does this mean for our ability to imagine catastrophe? This week on All the Best, we’re destroying Australian cities and towns, in all sorts of fictional, terrifying ways.
We’re ducking for cover and stocking up on canned goods. We’re digging bunkers and investing in solar panels. This episode is all about the apocalypse.

Melbourne Crumbling

Melbourne author Jane Rawson imagined a Melbourne in 2030, a Melbourne which is unbearably warm, a west full of slums and a city swelling with US dollars and UN soldiers. Here, she and Emma Kohen visit the Doutta Gala Hotel in Flemington, destroyed in Jane’s novel A Wrong Turn at the Office of Unmade Lists and talk about climate change, community, and the importance of leafy suburbs.

Produced by Emma Koehn

Music Credits: ‘Rarified’ by Podington Bear

Fallout

Professor Joseph Siracusa, a nuclear conflict expert talks to Leona Hameed about the day after. How would Melbourne cope in the event of a nuclear terrorist attack, and what has imagination got to do with it?  Dr. Leonie Cooper shows us around the Brave New World project at Monash University and Professor Keith Jacobs discusses why hope hope can be found in these crazy spaces.

Produced by Leona Hameed

Music Credits: ‘Overout’ by Johnny Ripper , ‘Little Cloud’ by Johnny Ripper, ‘Keep Them Alive’ by Nuclear Winter

Apocalypse Fiction

We asked writers to re-imagine the places they lived in apocalypse fiction.

Thanks to Yumi Iwama, Erin Handley, John Back and Deborah Kane for their contributions. The complete stories in which they destroy Melbourne, Tamworth, and rural Queensland can be read here.

Music credits: ‘Little Cloud’ by Johnny Ripper

Presenters:  Michael Brydon and Michaela Morgan

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Bruce Melendy / Flickr

#1418 Amazing Babes – Live at EWF

Inspired by Eliza Sarlos’s picture book Amazing Babes, the Emerging Writers’ Festival invited an incredible line up of writers to tell stories about the women who have inspired them, in their writing and their lives. It was a night to be inspired and celebrate the women who made us who we are. Here, we share some of their stories, and capture a slice of the nigh with music from Canberra-based girl band ‘Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret’ and three stories of truly amazing babes.

Brodie Lancaster on Tavi Gevinson

Cathy Petocz on Caryl Churchill + Jenny Kemp

Jo Randerson on all of the women

Music Credits:  ‘We Must’ written by Cathy Petocz and Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, and produced by Cinnamon Records, 2014. Performed by Cathy Petocz, Amanda Thorson, Luciana Harrison, Hannah de Feyter, and Jordan Rodger.  Their EP will be released in Winter 2014.

Wintercoats remix of ‘Transatlantica’ by Guerre features in Brodie Lancaster’s story.

Recorded and edited by Leona Hameed

Presenters: Michaela Morgan and Michael Brydon 

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Grace Lee

#1413 Harvest Festival

Nestled in between the houses, roads and busy day to day life of inner suburban Melbourne is a little slice of nature and simple living. This week, All the Best gets up at the crack of dawn when the roosters are crowing and spends the day at CERES Harvest Festival, in Melbourne’s East Brunswick.

Seita

Getting her face painted first thing in the morning, CERES events coordinator Sieta Beckwith spoke to Michael about the Harvest Festival.

Produced by Michael Brydon

Thabie and Robert

Robert and Thabie grow native flowers on their farm in Leongatha, their stall has mixed bunches of natives; proteaceae, kangaroo paw, banksia, leucadendron, pimelia and other natives in bunches of muted green and bright red. Behind their stall was a table selling apple cider, their area smelled of eucalyptus leaves and fresh apples. Leona asked them about their flowers and hovered around while they made sales.

Produced by Leona Hameed

Music Credits: Podington Bear – ‘Morning Mist‘ by Podington Bear, ‘Lulluby‘ by Podington Bear

The Petting Zoo

Surrounded by baby animals in an enclosure down by the CERES cafe, Tess spoke to Sally from Parklands Mobile Animal Farm.

Produced by Tess Lawley

Barry the Beekeeper 

There’s a lot of market stalls, selling organic fruit and vegetables. There’s a hemp clothing store and knitted beanies. And as Allison Worrall was meandering her way along the paths between the live entertainment area and the produce section, she found a busy stall beside a garden. It was a honey stall, with hardly any honey left. She spoke to bee keeper Barry Cooper.

Produced by Allison Worrall

The Farms in Our Yards

Carly and Tess interviewed Alistair From Ripe Near Me a buy, swap and sell food website and Robyn the publisher and editor of Pip a permaculture magazine. They discussed the options  we have as consumers to start taking control of what we eat and where it comes from and how that benefits the earth. They went in looking for a story and came out swapping tomatoes.

You can find the permaculture magazine pip here, or email editor, Robyn at robyn@pipmagazine.com.au. To swap pomegranates for avocados head to Ripe Near Me.

Produced by Carly-Anne Kenneally and Tess Lawley

Music Credits: ‘No Such thing as Waste’ ­by Formidable Vegetable Sound System, ‘City and Country’ by Jai Payne

Napoleon

The best part of a good farm – chickens. Michael spoke to Valerie about hens, roosters and Napoleon.

Produced by Michael Brydon

Music Credit: ‘The Funky Chicken’ by Rufus Thomas

Presenters: Michael Brydon and Michaela Morgan

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Michael Byrdon

#1406 These Women

Everyone can tell the story of an awesome woman. A mother, grandma, sister, friend, or teacher. This year International Women’s Day is celebrating women who inspire change, and today All the Best tells the stories of awesome women doing this in all sorts of ways. From a celebrant to a beekeeper, a journalist to young women sharing stories online, we look at the stories of Australian women.

Judy Aulich

Briefly, in December 2013, same-sex marriage was legalised in the Australian Capital Territory. Judy Aulich, a Canberra-based celebrant, performed 11 same sex marriage ceremonies in the five days it was legal. She tells that story to Farz Edraki, as well as some of the stranger weddings she’s performed in her time as a celebrant.

Produced by Farz Edraki

Music Credits: ‘Love is in the Air’ by John Paul Young, ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’ by ABBA, ‘Lovefool’ by Cardigans, ‘Son of a Preacher Man’ by Dusty Springfield, ‘Love Me Tender’ by Elvis Presley, ‘My Baby Just Cares for Me’ by Nina Simone

Creating Feminism

Feminism can sometimes seem like an exclusive club. Josie Wright looks at the ways that young women are making feminism more accessible, through creating, writing, and making.

Produced by Josie Wright

Uh huh honey

Melbourne City Rooftop Honey is a coalition of beekeepers who are introducing honeybees to the city in an effort to protect them from the ravages of disease and human habitation. Their honey is used and sold in restaurants across Melbourne. Vanessa showed us some of their hives nestled high above Federation Square in the CBD.

Produced by Leona Hameed

Music Credits: ‘Yeezus’ by Kanye West, ‘Sweet Nothings’ by Brenda Lee, ‘It’s Dope’ by J Dilla, ‘Slow Like Honey’ by Slow Like Honey, ‘The Birds and the Bees’ by Dean Martin

Woman to Woman

The next woman you’re going to hear from received a letter last year. She opened it standing in her kitchen, in the semi-darkness, after a long day of work. Joanne McCarthy, is journalist with the Newcastle Herald, a newspaper in the Hunter region on the New South Wales central coast. The letter was from another Australian woman, and it’s already become a celebrated part of Australian political history.

Produced by Jacqueline Breen

Presenters: Michaela Morgan and Michael Brydon 

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producers: Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Rebecca O’Callaghan

#1403 The Most Important Thing

Schools are made for learning, and everyone can name a few things they learnt in school. This episode is about the opposite. We asked a bunch of people “What’s the most important thing school never taught you?” The stories we heard in response feature a whole range of answers including taxes, testicles, failure, continents, conviction, and coding.

How to Learn

Leona Hameed asked her mum and two aunties about the most important things school never taught them.

Produced by Leona Hameed

Music Credits: ‘The Sound of Music’ and ‘Sixteen Going on Seventeen’ by Rogers and Hammerstein

How to Fail

Heidi Pett was very good at school. But it failed to teach her one vital lesson.

Produced by Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Music Credits: ‘The Future Wouldn’t That Be Nice’ by The Books

Taxes, Coding, Click-bait  

The question ‘What’s the most important thing school never taught you?’ was weighing on our minds for a while, so we collected the answers of just about everyone we know. Michael and Jess trawled through the responses, and there were some things that popped up again and again.

Produced by Michael Brydon and Jess O’Callaghan

Responsibility

We wanted to find out what a teacher thought their biggest lesson outside of school was, And whether they would try to teach it in their classes. Michael Brydon spoke to Kristen, a Primary School teacher from New South Wales.

Produced by Michael Brydon

Music Credits: ‘Suite 1’ by RJD2, ‘Circles From The Rue Simon – Crubellier’ by Max Richter

Identity

The most important thing Sharon never learnt at school was identity. Producer Bethany Atkinson-Quinton spoke to her about the things school never taught her about gender.

Produced by Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

To be comfortable in my own skin

Sometimes, what you don’t learn in school is something that you have to find out for yourself. Something that can’t be taught.

Produced by Michael Brydon

Music Credits: ‘Bobby’ by Bell Gardens, ‘On Dancefloors’ by Metronomy and ‘Fire it up’ by Modest Mouse.

Melbourne Features Executive Producer: Tess Lawley

Production Manager:  Carly-Ann Keneally

Executive Producers:  Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Feature’s Executive Producer:  Merran Winchester

Image Credit: Elizabeth Albert