#1635 Keepsakes Part 2/2

Last week we heard stories from the keepsake makers, the archivists and the preservers of history, recorded live at our Melbourne listening party, Keepsakes. This week, we’ll hear from the second half of that event.

In this episode we’re looking at the magic in nostalgia and reflection when we look back at the things we’ve saved.

The stories we recorded at Keepsakes have been transformed into an an audio exhibition. if you’re in Melbourne, we’d love for you to pay Keepsakes a visit! The exhibition is running until the 19th of November (that’s next week!) at The Good Room, 390A Lygon Street, Brunswick East. Head to www.thefoundlingarchive.org.au for details.

‘King Plates’ by Michael Brydon

In Museums all over this country you can find many and varied king plates. They’re these necklaces with a big bit of scrap metal, ornately cut into the shape of a crescent and engraved with things like Bulgra – King of Arremutta, Billy Kelly – King of Broadwater. Most of the stories of these kings and queens are now lost to history, but Michael Brydon looks back and asks: what’s a king without a kingdom?

‘Lars the Archivist’ by Zacha Rosen

The East German secret police — the Stasi — collected a massive archive on so many of their own citizens and after German reunification, their archives were opened: if they had a file on you, you could read it. How much stranger would it be if you, yourself, were an archivist, and could read a nonconsensual archive of yourself? Lars Rutz knows.

This story first aired on Not What You Think; head to www.fbiradio.com/notwhatyouthink for more.

Music: ‘Together’ – The XX, ‘Brain Retractor’ – Nick Cave and Warren Ellis

Supervising producers: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton, Beth Gibson and Bec Fary

‘Bad Thoughts’ by Beth Gibson

When Beth Gibson thinks of herself as a kid, she remembers a dreamy, creative little girl. But recently she found her old diaries, and they were…. pretty angry. Okay, really angry. She decides to delve deep into the diaries and her past to figure out who she really was as a 10-year-old.

Music: ‘Bumble’ and ‘Trundle’ – Podington Bear

Supervising producers: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton and Bec Fary

‘Brain Box’ by Cassandra Wright and Melissa Fletcher-Young

A wooden box, kept by six high school friends as a symbol of their friendship, and filled with letters to be later opened and shared with one another, now acts as an archive of their younger selves, containing the written thoughts and feelings of a group of girls that eventually grew apart. Cassie and Melissa take a look back on their formative years, and the keepsakes and traditions that made up a teenage friendship.

Music: ‘Under’ from the Flashback EP

Supervising producers: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton and Bec Fary

~

Executive Producer: Selena Shannon/Caitlin Gibson

Presenter: Michael Brydon

Vic State Coordinator: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

Community Coordinator: Chloe Gillespie

Episode Compiler: Bec Fary

#1541 Wish You Were Here

Earlier this month, our Melbourne Collective hosted a listening party with stories and sounds about distance. Last week on the show, we picked up signals from faraway. Today, in Part 2, we’re finding out what happens to the people who stay home. How do you communicate across distance? Can you bridge the gap?

Compromise

Michael and his partner Manderlee navigate the landscape of sharing a bed and try to figure out what’s better: sleeping alone, spooning, or a pillow substitute? You can hear a longer version of this story on the SleepTalker website.

Produced and scored with original music by Michael Brydon.

Can You Hear Me?

Mobile technology can put us in the pocket of someone on the other side of the world. But when the signal drops out, we might end up even further away than before. In this story, we wade through static on a long­distance phone call. Produced by Bec Fary.

Mother/Abai

Afghan ­Hazara migrant Taqi Khan came to Australia as an asylum seeker. Afghanistan is still riddled with danger, and the Hazara people are still suffering. Taqi wrote this letter to his mother. This piece features original music, sung in Hazaragi by Taqi Khan.

Produced by Josie Smart and Izzy Roberts­Orr for the ‘Dear/Hello’ segment series.

Honey Jumble/Almond

Izzy (aka ‘Almond’) shares sound letters with her distant pen pal, John (aka ‘Honey Jumble’).

Produced by Izzy Roberts­Orr.

Music credits ‘Mr E.’s Beautiful Blues’ by Eels, ‘PS’ by The Books, ‘Untitled’ by Barr, ‘Sensitive Fuck’ by Major Napier, ‘I’ll Be Right Here’ by Parking Lot Experiments.

Oceans Apart was produced by the All the Best Melbourne Collective: Bethany Atkinson- Quinton, Michael Brydon and Bec Fary. The music at the end of this episode is ‘Can’t Take You With Me’ by Bahamas.

Supervising Producer: Bec Fary

Features Executive Producer: Heidi Pett

State Coordinator: Bethany Atkinson­Quinton

Community Coordinator: Aidan Mollins

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

#1540 Oceans Apart

What does distance sound like? Today on All the Best, we’re crossing borders. We’re traversing long distances. We’re picking up signals from faraway.

Earlier this month, our Melbourne Collective hosted a listening party with stories and sounds about distance. On the show today, we’re hearing three stories from the night.

Ernesto Juan Castellanos

An excerpt from May Jasper’s soon­to­launch podcast, Random Article. May speaks to Cuban author, journalist and filmmaker Ernesto Juan Castellanos about how to be a hard­core music fan under a regime that sent pop underground.

Produced by May Jasper with sound design by Bec Fary. Music: ‘Love Me Do’ by The Beatles, ‘Wish You Were Here’ by Pink Floyd, ‘Baby Let Me Take You Home’ by The Animals, ‘Revolution’ by The Beatles and ‘Revolution 1’ By The Beatles.

The Yearn to Return

Can we stay connected to the places of our past? Made Stuchbery looks at nostalgia, and the pull of memory.

Produced by Made Stuchbery. Music: ‘Dark Water’ by Podington Bear and ‘Down By The River’ by Neil Young.

Gannet Migration

Maddy Macfarlane watches and listens to a group of gannets on their seasonal shift.

Produced by Maddy Macfarlane.

Oceans Apart was produced by the All the Best Melbourne Collective: Bethany Atkinson- Quinton, Michael Brydon and Bec Fary. The music at the very start of this episode was ‘Piano Froze Beat’ by Jai Leeworthy.

Supervising Producer: Bec Fary

Features Executive Producer: Heidi Pett

State Coordinator: Bethany Atkinson­-Quinton

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

#1534 Without Words

Listen closely because this week on All The Best we’re weaving our way in and out of the spaces between words and examining the meaning that’s hidden in silence. Think about how much we say without our words. What if you didn’t have words to communicate? What if we just choose not to speak? How would this change the way we interact with one another? What are we saying to each other with our touch, with our posture, with the amount of space we leave between each other when we sit next to one another, in our expression and in our silence?

Silent Love
Told by Monique Henry

Force Doesn’t Make Sense
Told by Jess Bell

Big Brother (Vipassana)
Told by Holly Masson
Produced by Bethany Atkinson-Quinton
Supervising Producer: Bec Fary

Episode Producer: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton
Supervising production from Jess O’Callaghan and Bec Fary, and transcription by Nabila Petrucci and Felicity Powell
Executive Producer: Heidi Pett
Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Music Credits:
The Books-PS 
Hannah Cameron- You Forgot
Alexander W Simms- Out In The Cold
Carlos Ramirez- Horizon
Bad Bats- Heterotropic (Where We Used To Belong)

#1531 Pilgrimage

Is there a place you’ve always wanted to go? Something that would be more than a holiday – a journey that you didn’t take to relax, but really to learn something from the way your feet hit the ground, to feel some sort of change at the end?

Modern life is full of weird, secular pilgrimages and today’s episode of full of those stories.

Trailwalker

A few years ago, Alex Penman completed the infamous 100m Oxfam Trailwalker challenge. He says it’s the most painful thing he’s ever done, and for some reason he’s training to do it again. Come along as he does it all again with a small team, and a recorder.

Produced by Alex Penman with Supervising Producer Bec Fary

Camino Del Santiago

The Camino de Santiago has traditionally been a catholic pilgrimage that intersects with pilgrimage paths all over Europe, until it ends in the Spanish city of Santiago. Starting from the French Pyrenees, Alice Chipkin walked nearly nine hundred kilometres over forty three days on an unplanned pilgrimage through Spain.

Produced by Emma Jensen

Music: Johnny’s Odyssey by Mac DeMarco

 

 

#1530 Old Pictures

Family albums, photos pressed between the pages of a second-hand book, a photo on a postcard, a greying, dog eared picture on Tumblr.

Old pictures are full of stories. They’re a window into another world, expressions frozen on faces, clothes just as they were.

What can they show us? And what are they hiding?

 

Para Dog

Produced by Sky Kirkham with additional production by Michael Brydon

 

We Were Always Here

John Ebert regularly posts vintage photos of gay couples on Twitter. Some photos are from as much as 100 years ago. He tags them with #wewerealwayshere. He says they were able to be taken as part of a gay underground that operated in those early times.

You can follow him at @sonoffidelis.

Produced by Rose Lane

Additional production by Sky Kirkham

 

On Tape

No one expects a box of tapes to explain the story behind a strangely posed photo of the grandparents.

But when he was looking through old family photographs, producer David Ross found a cassette made between his mum and her mum more than 20 years ago, where they talked about where his mum was born and why she came to be there.

It talks about a rather forgotten episode in the post-war centrifugal destruction of the British empire, as its long oppressed components spun off.

Produced by David Ross

Music Credits: Roma Khleb, RJB

 

State Coordinators: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton and Sky Kirkham

Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: Supplied by David Ross

#1528 Naked

Avert your eyes. This week on all the best we’re tackling one of the biggest remaining taboos – getting naked.
Because as liberated as you may feel, as comfortable in your own skin, when it comes down to it you pulled a shirt on over your head before trotting off to work today. You probably even primed your body with underwear.
We delve deeper into nakedness than any TV show ever could on a Saturday morning and tell stories of nudity, past and present.
Naked Law
Produced by Heidi Pett
Phallic Interpreter
Written and performed by James Robertson Hirst
Produced by Michael Brydon 
Nude
Produced by Riley Harrison
Naked For Satan
Produced by Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

State Coordinators: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton and Sky Kirkham

Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: Handcuffed / Flickr

#1526 Be Strong and Have Courage

“I remember in year 7 especially feeling really different from everyone, classic, and I remember feeling like there was a space where I was more myself than I could be at school.”
That place is Hashomer Hatzair, or ‘Hashy,’ a Jewish Socialist Zionist youth movement where producer Hannah Reich spent 10 years as a student and 2 years as a leader. But lately, her beloved movement has been struggling to find traction and children. It’s struggling to survive.
Hannah spoke with her friends who grew up in the movement to remind herself of what exactly what so unique about the time they spent there and then went back to summer camp, 5 years after leaving Hashy.
She recorded the sounds and ruach of camp and tried to understand the crisis that the leaders must overcome so that Hashy can be around for her kids.

Hannah
would like to thank the entire Hashy community past and present (in particular the 2014/2015 mazkirut), the Blay Family, her kvutza, her parents, Jess Leski and Ellie Kulas.
Episode Producer: Hannah Reich
Supervising Producers: Leona Hameed and Michael Brydon

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: Hannah Reich

#1523 ‘Limits’ – EWF Special

What happens when you send seven writers and seven producers to Docklands and force them to make a radio for a whole day? Well, it’s interesting.
All the Best teamed up with the Emerging Writers Festival to develop new stories on the theme ‘limits’ and this is what they created. We were at the city limits, on a time limit – it seemed fitting.
This episode features stories created on that day – a poem about the unluckiest man in history, a sci-fi tale set at the Docklands which may or may not be fiction, and the story of family pushed to their limits.
Two By Two
Written and produced by Georgia Symons and Michael Brydon
George Danton
Written and performed by Peter Salvatore Matthews
Produced by Zacha Rosen
Family Limits
Written and performed by Romy Durrant
Produced by Carly-Anne Kenneally
The Tropics
Written by Loni Jeffs
Produced by Emma Jensen
Coordinated by Izzy Roberts Orr and Jess O’Callaghan

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: Jes / Flickr

Music Credits: ‘Radio Gaga’ by Queen, ‘Docklands’ by Stevie Nicks

#1510 In A Day

A lot can happen in one day. Everything can change, or nothing can. Some days are special and some days are so completely ordinary that we can tell them apart from the others.

On one day this month, 24 hours at the beginning of March, we sent All the Best producers out in search of stories. They had only a day to find something to tell us on the radio – they learnt about kissing, about cooking, and growing older. And Michael interviewed a dragon.

Three Things I Learned About Kisses

Produced by Zacha Rosen

Paella 

Produced by Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

This is 31

Produced by Amy Tsilemanis

 

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: Zacha Rosen

 

 

 

 

#1501 Islands

The weather is warm, the sky is blue, and you have to go back to work.

Look, we agree, it sucks. This week we’ll try and drag the holiday out a bit longer, and take you on an island holiday. Three, in fact.

We’ll take you south to South-Western Victoria, to a tall, flat island with a pretty scary story behind it. We’ll head up north, to the bottom of the Great Barrier Reef, and climb up into a haunted lighthouse. We’ll take you to an island right in the heart of Melbourne…although it’s probably not the sort of island you’re imagining relaxing on.

This week on All the Best, – islands. Their stories, their histories, and their ghosts.

 

Deen Maar

As kids, Michael and his brother used to look out to the horizon off the coast of South-Western Victoria and on a clear day they could see it. A tall, flat island that we were told had a pretty scary story behind it. Here, he talks to Joel Wright about Deen Maar.

Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Lady Elliott Island

There’s an island at the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef, 45 hectares of land surrounded by the sea. Lady Elliot Island is an idyllic resort location, but not all of the residents sleep peacefully. In 1907, Susannah Mckee, the wife of the lighthouse keeper was found dead by her husband, and even now some of the resort’s employees claim that Susannah still haunts the grounds where she once lived. But why would Susannah be unable to rest? Rose Lane set out to investigate.

Story and narration: Rose Lane

Additional voice: Eoin Clements

Editing and Supervising Production: Sky Kirkham

Music Credits:

Lighthouse by Grouper

The great hidden sea of the unconscious by The Caretaker

Out to Sea by Olafur Arnalds

Ghost of Me by Shaula

Bluebeard 6 by Danny Norbury

 

Coode Island

Picture an Island. What do you see? It’s probably by itself, away from civilization, untouched by man. it has waves gently lapping at the shore with palm trees bordering a thick jungle. This story is not about that island.

Produced by Laura Kewley

Supervising Producer: Leona Hameed

Music Credits:

Nostalgia of an Ex-Gangsta-Rapper by Deef

 

Presenters:  Pip Rasmussen & Michael Brydon

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Paul D’Ambra 

#1443 Christmas Again

Back in 2011 ghost of All The Best past Eliza Sarlos and her partner hashed out what Christmas would look like for their brand new family, right here on the show. We decided to check back in – when does the tree go up? What goes on it? Importantly, does their little boy leave a glass of whiskey for Santa?
This week on All The Best we revisit a few of our favourite Christmas tales. Traditions both old and brand new, goblins wreaking havoc, and a most unlikely pair – Sister Myree Harris and Vic Hitchcock – a nun and an ex-con who are making their own Christmas miracles.

Goblin Night
Did you ever leave milk and cookies…or a scotch out for Santa? Well for Madelyne, her childhood was also filled with the tale of the Christmas Goblin…created by her dad Billy so he could watch the football.
Produced by Madelyne Cummings
With help from Radio Pro mentor Adam Zwi
Original music and sound design by Andrew Simmons

The Scallywag and the Saint

Sister Myree Harris and Vic Hitchcock are perhaps as different as two people could get. She’s a no-nonsense nun. He’s a larrikin ex-criminal. But the two of them work together every year to bring a bit of light to those who find Christmas to be the loneliest part of their year. As it turns out, their own story is something of a Christmas miracle.

Find out more about Sister Myree’s work here.

Produced by Kate Montague
Music: ‘Indian Love Song’ and ‘Kim’s Dirt’ by The Dirty Three; ‘Writing Poems’ by Ludovico Einaudi, from ‘The Intouchables’ soundtrack; ‘Kolapot’ by Amiina; ‘Familiar Ground’ by Cinematic Orchestra

Presenters: Michael Brydon & Pip Rasmussen Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan
Image Credit: Murilo Cardoso

#1439 West Writers Group

West Writers Group is a collective of writers from diverse backgrounds who currently live, work or have other established links to Melbourne’s West. It is a collective that will amplify the stories and voices of Melbourne’s West.

For the past few months All the Best producers have teamed up with some of the West Writers Group to bring you the stories in this week’s episode.

Emotions bubble to the surface, for better and for worse. Two characters swap anonymous notes, and another dwells on some terrible news. And there’s a toaster, but it’ll only communicate with Simon.

 

Control Your Emotions

People always say ‘you must control your emotions’. Why?

Written and performed by Latifa Elmrini
Produced by Harriet Conron
Music Credits: ‘Urban Tropic (Pt. ii)’ by Cosmic Analog Ensemble

 

Against Progress

The invention of the smartphone fundamentally changed the dynamics of Western society. The summer of 2000 can be easily seen as the last time we were truly alone. The last decade has made us open up like a shell, we suffer from emotional spillage, fast-food intelligence -we’re glued to the device that’s fundamentally changing our fabric of life.

Inspired by an encounter with a guy who missed his train at Parliament Station one night because he was on his phone, this poem voices the concerns we all have with this age but can’t seem the shake off because this is the future we have made for ourselves.

We love it but hate it because of the changes its creating in our lives too.

To add to the hypocrisy, the entire piece is written on an iPHONE too. So it’s completely mobile written – an on-the-go poem.

Written and performed by Ennis Cehic
Produced by Leona Hameed
Music Credits: Seekae – Void

 

Ninian, an excerpt from The Whitlow

This is an excerpt from Bob Carey-Grieve’s novel in progress called The Whitlow. The novel’s conceit is that the characters are all drawn loosely on Catholic Saints. Bob takes details from the recorded history of their lives, their nationality, patronage etcetera, and reimagines them in the contemporary setting of a Gippsland lawn bowling community. When a prized meat tray is stolen, the community has to come to terms with some of it’s darker secrets. The excerpt presented here introduces the central character of Ninian, and how his journey begins.

Written and performed by Bob Carey-Grieve
Produced by Philippe Perez
Music Credits:

 

Hidden Drawer

14 years ago, Imbi Neeme was having coffee in a London cafe when she found a hidden drawer in the table she sitting at that was filled with anonymous notes. She wrote her own note and put it inside – and has wondered ever since if anyone read it and what they thought.

From this experience, an idea for a story grew. Imbi is currently writing a novel in which two complete strangers each discover a hidden drawer in a West Footscray cafe and slowly get to know each other – and themselves – through the notes they leave for each other. This soundscape contains some of the notes they exchange.

Written and performed by Imbi Neeme
Production and Sound Design by Derek McCormack
Performed by Jane Rawson and Tim Stitz

 

The Toaster

Where do you find meaning? Everyone has to find it somewhere.

In this sharehouse, meaning is found in the messages that comes from the Toaster. The lives of the housemates and dynamics of the household revolve around what can be divined from white bread.

James say’s that people have thought this story is about everything from technology to cults but the only thing we’re certain of is that it’s not about toast. Or is it?
Written and performed by James Robertson Hirst
Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Presenter: Michael Brydon & Pip Rasmussen

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

 

Image Credit: Nour Abouzeid

#1437 Grief Part 1

Most of us will grieve for someone or something at some point in our lives, but it’s strange and hard to talk about. Feelings of grief are hard to think about, let alone say out loud.
This week on All the Best, you’ll be hearing part one of our exploration of grief. We’ll be treading that fine line between tribute and sentimentality, between feelings and what we’re expected to feel.
We’ll be thinking about death in all the wrong ways – because no one has figured out the right way yet.

 

Bagpipes
“They’ve got a very unique sound and some say you either love them all you hate them but people tell me when I’m playing them particularly at funerals.”
Donald Blair is pip major of the Warnabool Pipe Band, a retired dairy farmer, and played bagpipes at Michael’s grandad’s funeral.
What is it about some things – sounds, smells, music, that just brings on grief?
Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Care
Mum had grown tired, so I tried flooding the basement. I put Mr Zorro, her axolotl, into the water with her and she seemed happy. This piece was first published by Seizure.
Written and read by Paul Dalla Rosa
Sound by Jess O’Callaghan
Music Credits: ‘Glass Piano’ by Podington Bear

 

My Mother Told Me
What does grief look like to a child?
Written and produced by Selina Springett
Original music by Stephen Vitiello
Music Credits: ‘Lulu’ by Stephen Vitiello

 

Remembering Mum
This story was first broadcast on All the Best in 2012 as part of the episode #1235 A Few Of Our Favourite Things. How to you get to know someone when they’re not around? Before social media, it was through sheer detective work – asking questions, looking at old photographs, reading anything they’ve written or left behind. In the case of her mother, Madelyne Cummings’ own search led her to discoveries she could treasure forever.

Written and read by Madelyne Cummings
Produced by Que Minh Luu
Original music by Jamieson Shaw
Technical production by Antonia Gauci

 

Presenter: Michael Brydon & Pip Rasmussen

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Workers Party of Ireland

 

#1435 In the End

Frank Herbert was an American Science Fiction writer who died in 1986 and he famously said ‘There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.’

But that place can be frustrating. You know that feeling of finishing a really good story? You’ve been living in this other world for so long that when you emerge it feels strange to be amongst real things. Sometimes it feels like a loss, there are no more pages to turn, no more episodes to watch, no more podcasts in your feed.

This week, All the Best explores what happens in the end. The end of a life, the end of a book, the end of something that’s taken you a long time.

 

The End at Seven Years of Age

All of us ask the question of what happens ‘In the end’ at some point. For some it happens earlier than others, and our reactions vary, depending on the answers we get, or how easily we can distract ourselves from the question. For one girl, the void on the other side loomed large and early, and sparked a premature existential crisis.

Written by Caitlin Doyle Marwick

 

If I Could

If I could bring back that man you loved with words, I would do that here. If I could curl his easy smile across the page, I would do that here. If I could spread his eyes in pencil lines, and not in photos, I would do that here. But since I can’t, and since they’re gone, I do this here.

Written and Produced by Zacha Rosen

Music credits: ‘How Do You Slow This Thing Down’  by The Gothic Archies, ‘6/8 War ‘ by Leftfield, ‘Doll’s Polyphony’ by Geinoh Yamashirogumi, ‘The Society of the Crossed Keys’ by Alexandre Desplat, ‘The Lutz Police Militia’ by Alexandre Desplat, ‘Check Point 19 Criminal Internment Camp’ by Alexandre Desplat

 

Book Ends

That feeling that you get at the end of a really good book? The mix of satisfaction and devestation that it’s all over? Jess wondered if authors get something similar. What’s it like when you finish writing a book, and emerge into the real world?

Thanks to the authors who spoke to us for this story.

A.S. Patric is the author of short story collections Las Vegas for Vegans and The Rattler and Other Stories and a novella, Bruno Kramzer. For this story we spoke about his first novel, Black Rock White City, which will be published in April 2015 by Transit Lounge.

 Nicole Hayes is the author of Young Adult novel The Whole of My World, published by Random House in 2013.

Produced by Jess O’Callaghan

Music credits: Johnny Ripper

 

Presenters:  Michael Brydon and Michaela Morgan

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: azrasta

#1433 I’ve Seen You Around

The guy on the corner wearing a pirate hat. The man who says everything twice. The small, tanned smiling man who walks everywhere. The dancing man. The woman with long grey hair who plays piano. The eleven year old who busks as a statue. The shoe shiner. The barber who sings.

Every town and city has local characters who populate it. People who everyone knows or at least knows of. We might not know much about them, or who their friends and family are, but we know what they do every day and how they go about their lives.

This episode is all about the mystery of the local character. Some of them are real, and some of them are fictional.

The sausage who joined Michael in the studio, though, she was real.

 

Graham Graham

What makes someone a local character? Could we be local characters ourselves? Made Stuchbery explores this through a fictional story about a man named Graham who says everything twice.

Produced by Made Stuchbery

 

Flag Man

Everyone on Steve’s street knows who he is – they decode the flags that fly from the mas in his front yard.

Produced by Harriet Conron

 

Garage Sale

If you’ve ever had a garage sale in the Sydney region, you might have had an early morning knock on your door from VICKI WILLIAMS. Vicki is a garage sale enthusiast and nothing pleases her more than getting up at the crack of dawn to scour the possessions of strangers.

Produced by Karla Arnall

 

Michael was joined in the  studio by Brunswick local character Snags from the band The Burnt Sausages.

 

Presenters: Michael Brydon and Michaela Morgan 

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Harriet Conron

#1414 A Fear Of…

All the Best asks you to reveal your fears – the more irrational the better. Some of them are born out of lessons learnt and childhood disasters, and others come seemingly out of nowhere. You guys fear a lot of stuff. Blind dates, small holes, eggs, mannequins, speeding fines, frogs, neck-touching, technical difficulties, the Mad Hatter, public speaking. We look at fears and exposure ourselves to them.

 

May

Michael talks to Features EP Jess O’Callaghan about her fear of the month May, and making everyone come along for the irrational ride.

New Father

A new father shares his feeling about becoming a parent.  An audio story from the November 2013 Transom Online Workshop.

Produced by Kate Montague

Music Credits: ‘Biplanes’ by Poddington Bear

 

Being Imaginary

Imaginary fears and friends. An audio story from the November 2013 Transom Online Workshop.

Produced by Tess Lawley

 

Mannequins

It started at Sovereign Hill, when a husband chased his wife around the kitchen. Emma Koehn’s fear is totally rational.

Produced by Jess O’Callaghan

Music Credit: ‘Mensa’ by Podington Bear

 

Exposure Therapy

When Merran Reed was told she had social anxiety, it led her to group dedicated to facing their fears, through exposure therapy. You can read Merran’s column on exposure therapy here.

Produced by Jess O’Callaghan

 

Cars, speeding fines, frogs, blind dates, neck-touching

Leona Hameed asked a bunch of people what they fear the most.

Produced by Leona Hameed

Music Credits: ‘Drunken Tune’ by the Cinematic Orchestra

 

Eggs

We made poor Tess eat an egg. Thanks, forever, Tess Lawley.

Produced by Tess Lawley

Music Credits: ‘Hang Loose’ by Alabama Shakes

Presenters: Michael Brydon and Michaela Morgan

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: JimmyJoesJimmy

#1413 Harvest Festival

Nestled in between the houses, roads and busy day to day life of inner suburban Melbourne is a little slice of nature and simple living. This week, All the Best gets up at the crack of dawn when the roosters are crowing and spends the day at CERES Harvest Festival, in Melbourne’s East Brunswick.

Seita

Getting her face painted first thing in the morning, CERES events coordinator Sieta Beckwith spoke to Michael about the Harvest Festival.

Produced by Michael Brydon

Thabie and Robert

Robert and Thabie grow native flowers on their farm in Leongatha, their stall has mixed bunches of natives; proteaceae, kangaroo paw, banksia, leucadendron, pimelia and other natives in bunches of muted green and bright red. Behind their stall was a table selling apple cider, their area smelled of eucalyptus leaves and fresh apples. Leona asked them about their flowers and hovered around while they made sales.

Produced by Leona Hameed

Music Credits: Podington Bear – ‘Morning Mist‘ by Podington Bear, ‘Lulluby‘ by Podington Bear

The Petting Zoo

Surrounded by baby animals in an enclosure down by the CERES cafe, Tess spoke to Sally from Parklands Mobile Animal Farm.

Produced by Tess Lawley

Barry the Beekeeper 

There’s a lot of market stalls, selling organic fruit and vegetables. There’s a hemp clothing store and knitted beanies. And as Allison Worrall was meandering her way along the paths between the live entertainment area and the produce section, she found a busy stall beside a garden. It was a honey stall, with hardly any honey left. She spoke to bee keeper Barry Cooper.

Produced by Allison Worrall

The Farms in Our Yards

Carly and Tess interviewed Alistair From Ripe Near Me a buy, swap and sell food website and Robyn the publisher and editor of Pip a permaculture magazine. They discussed the options  we have as consumers to start taking control of what we eat and where it comes from and how that benefits the earth. They went in looking for a story and came out swapping tomatoes.

You can find the permaculture magazine pip here, or email editor, Robyn at robyn@pipmagazine.com.au. To swap pomegranates for avocados head to Ripe Near Me.

Produced by Carly-Anne Kenneally and Tess Lawley

Music Credits: ‘No Such thing as Waste’ ­by Formidable Vegetable Sound System, ‘City and Country’ by Jai Payne

Napoleon

The best part of a good farm – chickens. Michael spoke to Valerie about hens, roosters and Napoleon.

Produced by Michael Brydon

Music Credit: ‘The Funky Chicken’ by Rufus Thomas

Presenters: Michael Brydon and Michaela Morgan

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Michael Byrdon

#1411 Morwell

Back in February one of the coal mines in Morwell caught fire. The entire town was covered in ash. Residents were told to evacuate, the council was giving out masks while the rest of the state worried that they would lose power.

Now, the fires are under control but its left the local community in a bit of a state and its time for the cleanup to begin.

This week, we talk to the residents of Morwell about the aftermath of the open cut mine fire.

Steve Szabo

The mine fire is all south of the train tracks that run through Morwell but the bushfire that sparked the disaster began just north of the tracks on Toners Lane near Steve Szabo’s Golf Driving range.

Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Deb Hollis

Deb Hollis is a mother and a carer for her autistic son. She talks to Sally Whyte about the ways the ash and smoke from the fire effected her family.

Produced by Sally Whyte

 

Simon Ellis

Simon Ellis watched the fires start from his veranda. He shows Sally where they came in, and tells her about the effect the fire has had on his life and family.

Produced by Sally Whyte

 

Councillor Christine Sindt

We travelled to  Morwell was the day the EPA said that the air quality was safe for residents to return. A lot of Morwell, especially south of the railway tracks, have relocated to neighbouring towns, or Melbourne. Councillor Christine Sindt was one of the many residents who evacuated South Morwell.

Produced by Sally Whyte

 

Friends of the Garden

Morwell might be covered in ash and smell like smoke, but it is still full of roses. On the roundabouts, in people’s front yards and in the town’s rose garden. Del Matthews, Elizabeth Stewart and Karen Cooper tell Michael that the mine fire may have had an unintended beneficiary.

Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Music credit: Clinging To The Almost by Bell Garden Orchestra

 

Supervising Producer: Sally Whyte

Presenters:  Michael Brydon and Michaela Morgan

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producers: Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Sally Whyte

 

#1409 Faith

You know the old rule – it’s impolite to talk about politics or religion. This week on All the Best, we break it, bringing you stories of faith. We ask people brazenly about their beliefs and take a look at a church without a religion.

Michael was joined in the studio by Elizabeth Redman, and they had a chat about a couple of instances where her faith as a Christian and her job as a journalist have come together in different ways. They spoke about comedy and climate change.

I Believe

Why do people believe in what they do? Whether they’re Christian, Muslim or a Scientologist, their belief comes from somewhere, sparked by something. Zoe Ferguson spoke to people about their religion and how they came to believe.

Produced by Zoe Ferguson

Music Credits: Nujabes

Sunday Assembly

A new church has opened in Sydney, but there’s a funny thing about it: there’s no God. There’s no Allah either. No Jesus, no Mary, no Vishnu, there’s no Bible and no Koran. In fact, at this church there’s no religion at all. It’s called the Sunday Assembly and basically it’s a church for atheists.

One Sunday morning, Jacqueline Breen went along curious about what these people are looking for, wondering whether they can find it in this not-church in Redfern.

Produced by Jacqueline Breen

Music Credits: ‘Wonderwall’ by Oasis

 

Presenters: Michael Brydon and Michaela Morgan

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producers: Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Marina Burity

Music Credits: ‘Laughing With’ by Regina Spektor 

 

#1405 Endangered Jobs

Technology is taking all the jobs. It’s hard to avoid articles and opinions about the end of video stores, of newspapers, of the humble bookshop. This week, we went looking for a few of those endangered jobs – a man giving a heartfelt eulogy for his bookstore, and a mother suddenly made redundant. We hear from the tram conductors of Melbourne and about the surprising success of a bricks and mortar video shop.

Bookshop

When was the last time you bought a book from a bookshop? Physical, paper-paged books are fewer and fewer. This is the story of a beloved Sydney bookshop, Maclay Books, which is closing its doors this weekend.

Produced by Monique Sebire

Music Credits: ‘I Read A Lot’ by Nick Lowe, ‘Falcon Hood (Tight)’ by Podington Bear, ‘The Wild One’ by Johnny O’Keefe, ‘Friday on My Mind’ by The Easybeats, ‘Pink Bullets’ by The Shins,

Tram Conductor

It might have been a while since “fares please” was heard on Melbourne’s trams, but it wasn’t so long ago that each tram had its own conductor. This is the story of one tram conductor, Jeff, who spoke to Michael about his old job.

Produced by Michael Brydon

Mum

This is the story of Carly’s mum, who had always been a mum and once her children finished school went on to be a successful Australian designer and personality.

Produced by Carly Anne Kenneally

Music Credits: ‘(They long to be) Close to You by The Carpenters, ‘Can’t Stop’ by the Red Hot Chilli Peppers, ‘Mama’ by the Spice Girls and ‘Say a Little Prayer’ by Aretha Franklin

Video Store

If it’s been a while since you hired a DVD or video – you’re not alone. Video stores seem to be on there way out, but the Film Club in Darlinghurst is no ordinary video store.

Produced by Kim Tan

Presenters: Michael Brydon and Michaela Morgan

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producers: Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Stephen-Cleary

#1404 Bravery

There are many different ways to be brave. In fiction, stories of bravery are told as grand gestures and epic battles – these three stories are about real, everyday bravery, the kind we find in our friends and family. A text message from a friend, a soldier standing by his daughter, and a band who packed up everything and headed for the east coast. From standing up for what you believe in, to being yourself no matter what it takes and chasing your dreams – a few brave souls have agreed to share their stories with us.

 

We Shall Overcome

War has for centuries been an arena for a particular type of bravery. Our first story is about the bravery of one particular soldier, though not on the battlefield.

Produced by Michael Brydon
Music Credit: ‘We Shall Overcome’ by Pete Seeger, ‘Rooftop’ by Duke Ellington

My Friend Frankie

Shaping your identity can be a scary experience, especially when you don’t fit within certain specifications. Tess Lawley shares the story of Frankie, who has been making some pretty brave decisions on the way to working out their identity.

Produced by Tess Lawley
Music Credits: ‘Cauliflower Jack’ by Caitlin Park

Ensemble Formidable

Bravery often rears it’s head when there is a decision to be made, and many of us face our most difficult decisions when thinking about our careers. This story is about the band Ensemble Formidable, and the fun, stupid, brave decisions you have to make when you’re a musician.

Produced by Emily Woods
Music Credits: Ensemble Formidable

 

Melbourne Features Executive Producer: Tess Lawley

Production Manager: Carly-Ann Keneally

Executive Producers: Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Feature’s Executive Producer: Merran Winchester


Image Credit: Washington Area Spark

#1403 The Most Important Thing

Schools are made for learning, and everyone can name a few things they learnt in school. This episode is about the opposite. We asked a bunch of people “What’s the most important thing school never taught you?” The stories we heard in response feature a whole range of answers including taxes, testicles, failure, continents, conviction, and coding.

How to Learn

Leona Hameed asked her mum and two aunties about the most important things school never taught them.

Produced by Leona Hameed

Music Credits: ‘The Sound of Music’ and ‘Sixteen Going on Seventeen’ by Rogers and Hammerstein

How to Fail

Heidi Pett was very good at school. But it failed to teach her one vital lesson.

Produced by Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Music Credits: ‘The Future Wouldn’t That Be Nice’ by The Books

Taxes, Coding, Click-bait  

The question ‘What’s the most important thing school never taught you?’ was weighing on our minds for a while, so we collected the answers of just about everyone we know. Michael and Jess trawled through the responses, and there were some things that popped up again and again.

Produced by Michael Brydon and Jess O’Callaghan

Responsibility

We wanted to find out what a teacher thought their biggest lesson outside of school was, And whether they would try to teach it in their classes. Michael Brydon spoke to Kristen, a Primary School teacher from New South Wales.

Produced by Michael Brydon

Music Credits: ‘Suite 1’ by RJD2, ‘Circles From The Rue Simon – Crubellier’ by Max Richter

Identity

The most important thing Sharon never learnt at school was identity. Producer Bethany Atkinson-Quinton spoke to her about the things school never taught her about gender.

Produced by Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

To be comfortable in my own skin

Sometimes, what you don’t learn in school is something that you have to find out for yourself. Something that can’t be taught.

Produced by Michael Brydon

Music Credits: ‘Bobby’ by Bell Gardens, ‘On Dancefloors’ by Metronomy and ‘Fire it up’ by Modest Mouse.

Melbourne Features Executive Producer: Tess Lawley

Production Manager:  Carly-Ann Keneally

Executive Producers:  Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Feature’s Executive Producer:  Merran Winchester

Image Credit: Elizabeth Albert

#1402 Adaptation

Fires, floods, melting ice and strange weather patterns. The effects of climate change can already be seen in a lot of ways, from the way someone farms, to the way a house is built, to the place someone parks their car to drink a coffee and look out over the ocean. In this episode, we bring you stories of adaptation, the small and the large.

The Great American Adaptation Road Trip

When Kirsten Howard and Allie Goldstein finished studying at the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and Environment, they set off on a three month road trip in Kirsten’s Mum’s minivan. Driving clockwise around North America, they documented the ways different communities are adapting to changes in their climate.

Stories from Kirsten and Allie’s road trip can be found on their website.

Produced by Jess O’Callaghan

Music Credits: ‘Lola’ by Podington Bear, ‘Another Travelling Song’ by Bright Eyes

Floods

Even today, signs of the big 1974 flood still stand around the town of Lismore, in regional New South Wales. They serve as a reminder of the threat of the river. Wally, a Lismore resident, talks about the way the community lives when floods are often imminent.

Produced by Emma Jensen

Not a Dystopian Future

Floods and fire have been part of the landscape of Australia for a long time, but with climate change making things more extreme, what will the way we live look like? When will the way we live shift from being green to surviving in this new world? Michael Brydon tried to find out.

Produced by Michael Brydon

Music Credits: ‘Ritual Road Map’ by Calexico, ‘Sapphire’ by Bonobo, ‘Woodenmen’ by Plutonic Lab, ‘Fruitcup’ by Bell Gardens

Melbourne Features Executive Producer: Tess Lawley

Production Manager:  Carly-Ann Keneally

Executive Producers:  Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Feature’s Executive Producer:  Merran Winchester

Image Credit: JCSullivan

#1317 Postcards from Reconciliation

Just in time for National Reconciliation Week, and in co-production with Redfern Community Centre, All the Best presents Postcards from Reconciliation. A man sends a postcard home about his lover: a proud man of the Bundjalung Nation, a historical postcard raises uncomfortable questions about a famous colonial figure and a Gumbangiir woman’s postcard is a clarion call to love the place you’re from- for both indigenous and non-indigenous Aussies.

My City- Sydney
A postcard from Gumbangiir woman Barbara Greenup-Davis starts as a flaneur’s stroll through the city, and ends with a vision of one city all its residents can rally for.

Written and read by Barbara Greenup-Davis, a Gumbangiir woman from Bowra, NSW.
Produced by Tim Bishop at Redfern Community Centre.
Music credits: Backing guitar: ‘Warm & Windy’ by J.D.Loudermilk (with permission); Played by Gerry Doyle (with permission).

My Man and Me
From Newtown, Sydney and heading out on the highway: a lover’s postcard from a life-long road trip.

Written and produced by Tim Bishop. Hear more of Tim’s work on his ABC Pool page.
Sound design by Tim Bishop and Belinda Lopez.

Picture credit (above): ‘Going North, heading home’ by Tim Bishop.

Music credits: ‘Throw Your Arms Around Me’ by Hunters and Collectors; South of the Border by Patsy Cline; ‘You Can Get It if You Really Want’ by Jimmy Cliff; ‘That’s the Way Love Is’ by Marvin Gaye; ‘Got to Give it Up’ by Marvin Gaye;  ‘Brown Skin Baby’ by Bob Randall.
Sound credits: ‘Car driving’ by Geody Labs; ‘Fryer’s Forest Kookaburras’ by Kangaroo Vindaloo.

Buckley’s Chance for Truth?
A convict disappears into the Australian bush, and emerges 32 years later, alive. His name was William Buckley, and his tale is featured in the history books as one of courage, survival and sheer luck. In fact, it’s thought the phrase ‘Buckley’s chance’ was inspired by his story. William Buckley survived after making contact with the Wathaurong people, who took him into their tribe and made him an honorary elder. It sounded like a story about reconciliation. But the Wathaurong people today, however, say they had never before been contacted about William Buckley’s story. They tell a tale very different to the history books.

Read more about the Wathaurong in this article by Michael Brydon.

Produced by Michael Brydon.
Music credits: ‘Making Days Longer’ by RJD2; ‘Stéphanie Quitte Le Caffé’ by Jean-Michel Bernard; ‘Towers (feat. Szjerdene)’ by Bonobo; ‘Ghost Song’ by Air; ‘Bloodflood’ by Alt-J.

Production Manager: Carly Anne Kenneally.
Features Executive Producer: Belinda Lopez.
Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo.

End song credit: ‘Fleetingly’ by Stiff Gins.