#1720 Picking up the pieces

Stephen hasn’t seen his high school girlfriend in nearly 30 years. Things didn’t end so well when they were teenagers, but suddenly he has the opportunity to reconnect with her. The only thing is something has changed in Stephen, something very big, and he’s not sure if his high school sweetheart is ready to find out.

This week we’re talking about picking up the pieces from a past life and building something completely new.

~~~

‘The only hole in my life’ by Carey Scheer

Carey met Stephen when she interviewed him for a video project in his home. A year later, Stephen contacted her out of the blue saying he had a crazy story for her, about his past life catching up with him.

Music: Back in Black by AC/DC, Dead Already by Thomas Newman, Heroin by Velvet Underground, We Love You Michael Gira by Ben Frost, Theory of Machines by Ben Frost, To Build a Home by Thematic Pianos and Paradise City by Guns n Roses

Supervising producer: Tegan Nicholls and Selena Shannon

With thanks to Stephen and Tracey, and Marc Gierke for moral support and musical inspiration. And thanks to The Basem3nt for their studio. 

~~~

‘Fragments’ by Ellie Parnell

In 2011, Saskia Scott lost her mother. During the grieving period that followed, Saskia found herself surrounded by reminders of her mum. Bits and pieces left behind, her belongings, but mostly her piles of clothes. Now, years on, Saskia has found a way to deal with the grieving process through her ceramic art practice.

Saskia’s website: http://saskiascott.com/
Instagram: www.instagram.com/saskia_scott/

Music: ‘Kola’ by Amiina, ‘Stellify’ by Frederico Albanese and ‘Angels’ by Adrianna Lenker and Buck Meek

~~~

All The Best credits:

Executive Producer: Selena Shannon

Host: Jess Hamilton

Episode Compiler: Tegan Nicholls

Vic State Coordinator: Bec Fary

SYN production manager: Beth Gibson

Community Coordinator: Chloe Gillespie

Social Media: Louisa Thurn

Image by Carey Scheer

 

#1710 Life After

#1710 Life After

What does life feel like in the wake of death? How do we cope, who do we turn to, and what can we do to make it better when we’re left behind?

This week we’re looking at life after loss.

~

‘Where the sky meets the sea’ by Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

When you stare at a mountain, the sheer enormity of nature stares back.

Our first story this week is the final piece from our recent listening party in Sydney, where we played a collection of nocturnal stories about sex, worry, midnight adventures and, finally, the darkness of grief.

In a culture where death and grief are tucked away from conversation and rarely understood, Bethany Atkinson-Quinton unpacks how our emotional pallet shifts with the tides and echoes in the wind.

If you can, we recommend you listen to this one with headphones, in a quiet, calm, space.

Made in loving memory of Daniel.

Music: fran_ky – Bell Bowed with Grief, Brian Eno With Daniel Lanois & Roger Eno – Landscapes with Haze, Bing & Ruth – Flat Line_Peak Color, Rafael Anton Irisarri – Waking Expectation, New Dawn – The Power Of You, New Dawn – Organza, Brian Eno With Daniel Lanois & Roger Eno – The Water Farden

~

‘Last man standing’ by Joshua Garlepp

Every year Josh’s mum, who doesn’t have extended family of her own, drags Josh to a different family’s house for Christmas. Josh is from WA, and for the last three years, he and his mum have spent Christmas with the same family in Bunbury, Southwest of Perth. The Barretts.

The first year, Josh spent a lot of time with Adrian Barrett, the young dad of the family. On the drive home after Christmas, Josh asked his mum what Adrian does for a living. Turns out he’s part of one of the oldest businesses in Western Australia and it was in no way what Josh expected…

Music: “Still Trying” – Nathaniel Rateliff, “Plastic People” – Four Tet, “Milk & Honey” – Arcade Fire

~

If this week’s stories brought up any difficult feelings, you can talk to someone by calling lifeline on 13 11 14, or get support online at eheadspace.org.au

~

Executive Producer: Selena Shannon

Vic state coordinator: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

SYN production manager: Beth Gibson

Community Coordinator: Chloe Gillespie

Host: Jessica Hamilton

Episode Compiler: Tegan Nicholls

Image by flickr creative commons user Javier Piernagorda

#1709 A Night Away

A lost sex toy, the persistence of nightingales, and the choices about life and love we make after the sun goes down.

This week is our second instalment of stories from our listening party in Sydney, where we invited an audience to spend a night with All The Best. In this episode we’ll be taking you on midnight adventures around the world, from skipping through volcanic craters in Guatemala, to finding regret and self discovery in North England.

‘The Nightingale Man’ by Selena Shannon

When Selena moved from sunny Sydney to the dark depths of Swedish winter, she sometimes asked herself why she decided to migrate, even for only 6 months, to a place where the night never really transitions into day. But her experience and her perspective changed when she followed The Nightingale Man to Berlin.

Thanks to Zacha Rosen and Bec Fary for their feedback.

Music: ‘Through the mist’ by Vincent Kiego Webb, ‘Unearthy untaught strain’ and ‘The night the war ends’ by David Rothenberg. Credit to an excerpt from the BBC’s “Why Birds Sing”.

‘Be still, Woodpecker’ by Josephine Smart

When the music has finally stopped playing and the night owls have danced their way home to bed, Josephine Smart embarks on a midnight adventure and learns about risk, choice, and late night love.

Just a heads up, this story has some adult themes.

This story features lines from the book ‘Still Life With Woodpecker’ by Tom Robbins. Josie is a Melbourne-based producer and sound artist who also creates radio stories for an audio project called Dear/Hello, you can hear more of her work at dear-hello.com.

Music mixed by Josephine Smart

‘At night I marry the bed’ by Jessica Knight

Jessica Knight has lost something quite dear to her… and this story also deals with some sexual themes.

Production assistance from Bec Fary and Selena Shannon. Jessica is a poet, writer and zine maker based in Melbourne. Her three zines: Tongue Between Teeth, White and Red Cells, and All The Fussy People And A Fussy Little Sick are available to purchase on the website mcdrawn.com. Her writing can be found on her blog at Gremlinface82@wordpress.com and you can follow her on twitter @themess19 to get lots of tiny little poems and pictures of Merlin, her housemate’s cat.

Music: ‘A Walk’ by Tycho, ‘Klara’ by Ólöf Arnalds 

~

Executive Producer: Selena Shannon

Vic state coordinator: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

SYN production manager: Beth Gibson

Community Coordinator: Chloe Gillespie

Host: Jessica Hamilton

Episode Compiler: Tegan Nicholls

Image by creative commons user Craig Hennecke

#1708 What keeps me up at night

Stories straight from our Audiocraft listening party! If you missed the midnight garden gathering, here is the first instalment of nocturnal tales we made for our Sydney relaunch event “Spend a night with All The Best”. Four pieces from contributors who just can’t sleep, all for different reasons, and want you to lie awake with them.

This episode is part one of our listening party stories, more next week.

‘Es la una de la mañana’ by Sam Loy

Sam probably spends too long pondering his existence, going over moments from his life to judge what kind of person he is. He definitely should be sleeping…

Sam Loy is the radio brains behind the fantastic podcast Human/Ordinary, you can check it out here: http://humanordinary.com/

Supervising Producer: Jess Bineth

Original music by Kent Sutherland, and ‘Gasolina’ by Daddy Yankee

Special thanks: Ramon Martinez-Mendoza

‘Awake’ by Merran Winchester, with Andy Nichols

Merran and Andy are about to begin a new adventure. It’s like nothing they’ve done before. And though it brings them great joy, it also brings up a lot of questions about the great unknown.

Music: Isaac Verhaeghe – ‘Tomorrow’

‘Lucy, wake-up’ by Britta Jorgensen

Lucy and Jackson are a 20-something couple living in a sunny share house in Thornbury, Melbourne. By day, Lucy is a florist and Jackson is an artist and musician. At night, their relationship takes on a different tone…

Supervising producer: Bec Fary

Music: ‘The Telling’ by Blue Dot Sessions 

‘Unbelonging’ by Magan Magan and Bec Fary

Magan Magan is a Melbournian poet. In this piece, he wanders dark streets, finds inspiration for his writing, and reads three poems: ‘The Thin Line of Loneliness’, ‘Waking Up At Night’ and ‘Moon Street’. Editing and sound design by Bec Fary.

Bec and Magan first met at last year’s National Young Writers’ Festival, where they collaborated on an audio version of ‘Moon Street’.

Supervising producer: Bec Fary

Music: ‘On a Rotating Sphere’ and ‘Aftersexwindowpaneglow’ by Joseph, ‘Toxick Spill’ by Ad Serpentae, ‘The Perpetual Dream Machine’ by The Icarus Descent, ‘Benen Värka’ by Bisamratta

 ~

A big thank you to Audiocraft for presenting this event, and 107 Projects in Redfern for having us!

Executive Producer: Selena Shannon

Vic state coordinator: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

SYN production manager: Beth Gibson

Community Coordinator: Chloe Gillespie

Host: Jessica Hamilton

Episode Compiler: Tegan Nicholls

Image by flickr creative commons user meg

#1617 Online Identities

It’s 2016, so it’s more than likely you have an online identity. In fact, you may struggle to remember a world without the internet, without a way for your followers to echo your political views, to see what you had for lunch, and to keep up to date on how #blessed you are. But what’s behind the profile pics and status updates? And what can we learn about our real world selves from it?

This week we’re dedicating the entire episode to a feature-length documentary, a beautiful and in-depth look at who we become online from Melbourne-based producer Jess Fairfax.

All music composed by Jess Fairfax, apart from ‘The Looney Tunes theme’

 

Executive Producer: Selena Shannon

Vic State Coordinator: Bethany Atkinson-Quinton

Presenter: Michael Brydon

Image: Flickr creative commons user Jared Cherub

#1606 Lead Affected

 

“I felt betrayed, because I loved Broken Hill and I loved my house and I loved the town, and I loved the streets and I loved everything about it. And to think that my lovely town was poisoning my beautiful baby was heartbreaking.” 

Broken Hill sits on the world’s largest known deposit of silver, lead and zinc, which they’ve been mining continuously since its discovery in 1883. It’s a town built on mining. The streets are named after the minerals dug from the earth and the people who live there are proud of their history of unionism and industry.

It’s also a town with a lead problem. Over a hundred years of mining and a few years of smelting have scattered the toxic substance into the environment. It’s in the dust, building up in people’s ceiling cavities, on their water tanks, the lounge room carpet. From there it gets on kids hands, into their mouths, their blood and then their brains, where it leads to intellectual and behavioural problems.

Sometimes, when a town is reliant on a single and damaging industry, a sort of wilful blindness develops. It’s called industrial capture.

Producer: Heidi Pett

Music in order of appearance: 

Unknown punter singing ‘Better Be Home Soon’ by Crowded House, recorded during karaoke at the Palace Hotel, formerly ‘Mario’s Place’

‘Tainted Love’ by Ed Cobb, covered by Lead Affected and recorded at band practice in Broken Hill

‘How’s Your Wife’ by Caitlin Park


Kate and Daniel

Daniel Farrugia and Kate Marsden with their children Greta and Avie. They left Broken Hill after they couldn’t lower Avie’s blood lead levels

Slag heap from the Palace

Looking over the slag heap from the balcony of the Palace Hotel on Broken Hill’s main street

Esther La Rovere

Esther La Rovere is one of the owners of the iconic Palace Hotel. As a local business owner, she’s hesitant to speak up about the issue

Dulcie blood lead level
Dulcie O’Donnell’s boys had elevated blood lead levels as children. She’s kept their childhood records which she’s hoping to present in court

Dulcie O'Donnell
Dulcie blames childhood lead exposure for her boys behavioural problems. She says she’s had a hard time with them since they were kids; they were in trouble at school and now in the justice system

Lead Affected 2
Serge, Darren and Donny from local band Lead Affected

CAMA5263
The rail line heading west to South Australia

Joanne Boog
Joanne Boog received death threats for her role in the campaign to have children’s blood lead levels tested in the early 90’s. She’s since moved to Dubbo

#1532 Then It Was Us – Syrian Refugees in Amman

 

I have a big mission coming in two days and they want to go to Za’atari and I said “If you want to go to Za’atari I will take you to the Dead Sea, and I will take a photo of you at the Dead Sea, because you are coming for tourism. Everybody that needs to go to Za’atari from the humanitarian community and the donor community has been there already.”

This week on All The Best we’re staying in the Jordanian capital, Amman.  While Za’atari, the huge camp in the north of the country that was at one stage home to more than 150 000 refugees – making it the fourth largest city in the country – receives the majority of media and donor attention, most Syrian refugees live in the capital. They’re struggling to work and live in a city where they are largely unsupported and often undocumented. With few prospects of going home, or limited possibilities of moving forward, they wait.

Domenique Sherab brings you the stories of Mohammad, Abeer, and Bu.

Producer: Domenique Sherab
Supervising producer: Heidi Pett
Music: Bu Kolthum, Nassif Shamma, and The Partysquad & Boaz van de Beatz
Translation: Sanabel Yousef and Eman Alajaj, voiced by Kate Montague
Image: Domenique Sherab

#1526 Be Strong and Have Courage

“I remember in year 7 especially feeling really different from everyone, classic, and I remember feeling like there was a space where I was more myself than I could be at school.”
That place is Hashomer Hatzair, or ‘Hashy,’ a Jewish Socialist Zionist youth movement where producer Hannah Reich spent 10 years as a student and 2 years as a leader. But lately, her beloved movement has been struggling to find traction and children. It’s struggling to survive.
Hannah spoke with her friends who grew up in the movement to remind herself of what exactly what so unique about the time they spent there and then went back to summer camp, 5 years after leaving Hashy.
She recorded the sounds and ruach of camp and tried to understand the crisis that the leaders must overcome so that Hashy can be around for her kids.

Hannah
would like to thank the entire Hashy community past and present (in particular the 2014/2015 mazkirut), the Blay Family, her kvutza, her parents, Jess Leski and Ellie Kulas.
Episode Producer: Hannah Reich
Supervising Producers: Leona Hameed and Michael Brydon

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: Hannah Reich

#1518 Ayahuasca

Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic brew historically and traditionally used by shamans in the Amazon basin to gain access to the spirit world. In the past decade more and more tourists are travelling to Peru to drink ayahuasca in hopes of having an enlightening experience. But what does it mean when a cultural practice is commodified and packaged for tourists?

In this episode of All the Best, producer Lily Ainsworth explores the world of ayahuasca, and the Australians who seek it.

 

Episode Producer: Lily Ainsworth

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit:  Terpiscore 

Music Credits: 

#1515 A Walk In The Park

 

When 17-year-old Masa Vukotic was murdered in the Melbourne suburb of Doncaster while out for a walk in a park near her house, the Victorian Homicide Squad Chief responded to the tragedy by suggesting this: “…people, particularly females, they shouldn’t be alone in parks…I’m sorry to say that is the case.”

And it hit a nerve. Because women shouldn’t be afraid for their lives walking in a park. A walk in the park should be a walk in the park. An evening run should be an evening run, a night out should be a night out, a drink should be a drink, a date a date. Riding a bike home should be something we can do without fearing for our lives.

This week on All the Best we look at the chasm between a walk home for women and a walk home for men. We tell stories of street harassment, violence against women, and varying experiences of public places.

Women are already walking in fear – what does it mean when those in authority suggest they shouldn’t be walking at all?

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this episode: Lucy Watson, Ebony Bennett, Jane Gilmore, Jenna Price, Lily King, Hannah Reich, Bec Fary, Rose Randall, Josie Smart, Izzy Roberts-Orr, Bethany Atkinson Quinton, Tess Lawley.

Original sound design on our walks home was by Alyx Dennison.

 

The Hoopla published an extended version of Jane Gilmore’s Facebook Status, titled ‘Don’t, Don’t, Don’t Get Yourself Killed’

You can read Lucy Watson’s story ‘Reflections On My Assault, One Year Ago Today’ on New Matilda.

Here’s Jenna Price on shouting back at street harassers.

And a break down of that report by the Australia Institute on Australian women’s experiences of street harassment.

 

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: A public space text-based projection by Melbourne artist Stephanie Freda Leigh

Music Credits: Original sound design on our walks home by Alyx Dennison. “Take It All” by Evelyn Ida Morris. White Sheet Beach. 

#1514 Grapes of Ridicule

What are you looking for when you buy a bottle of wine? If you’re alone do you reach for the cleanskin? If you’re sharing it with friends maybe you want something a bit more fancy, a wine to show off, mark you as someone who knows their shit.

If you’re taking it to your parents house or giving it as a gift perhaps you’ll look closer to the top of the shelf, or judge the wine by it’s cover. Maybe you’ll look for the award stamps that mean other people have swirled and spit out your cabernet and judged it to be worth your time.

This week on All the Best, producer Yasmin Parry delves into the world of wine, and the stories that come with each bottle.

Image Credit: Evan Wood

#1508 A Way With Words

Some things are harder to say than others. The most important things to say, messages you really want to get across, can be boring and complicated. Or you might not feel comfortable saying them at all.

There are people all over Australia learning to express themselves using poetry -and not the kind you learned in school. This week on All the Best, Maisie Cohen explored the world of performance poetry. She spoke to activists, community housing residents and prisoners all learning to use poetry to express their ideas. There are poems about oil and gas fracking on the coast off Indigenous land, poems about disadvantage and racism, poems about human connection.

Head to our blog for photos and videos from workshops around the country, including a short doco shot by producer Maisie Cohen.

Produced by Maisie Cohen

Supervising Production by Heidi Pett

 

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: Luka Lesson
Music Credit:

#1507 Legal Walls

Access to the law is something it’s easy to take for granted – if there’s an injustice, if you are wronged, we’re taught to believe that the law has the ability to make that wrong right again.
In 1977, the lack of affordable legal service options for disadvantaged and marginalised people led to the opening of NSW’s first community law centre, the Redfern Legal Centre.
This week on All the Best, Jess Minshall visits the people working there today, and the sort of wrongs they’re trying to right. There are limits to the law, limits you don’t even imagine until you’re right up against them. For the lawyers, social workers and students working at the centre, they see people come up against them every day.

 

Features Executive Producers: Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett

Presenters: Pip Rasmussen and Michael Brydon

Image Credit: Jess Minshall

Music Credit:   ‘The Room is the Resonator’ by Oliver Coates,  ‘Silk’ by Thrupence 

#1506 Best Practice

A lot of us trust our doctors to make us healthy, or at least to cure our illnesses. But can they make us happy? According to the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health, one in two Australians will experience a mental health disorder at some point in their lives. Research organisations and support networks like Beyond Blue and the Black Dog Institute, are working to destigmatise depression and mental illness.

As a society, we’re talking about depression and mental illness more than we ever have, but are we getting any better at treating it? Bec Fary looks at the treatment of mental illness in Australia.

Thanks to Professor Jane Gunn, Professor Lena Sanci, and Rose Randall.

If you or anyone you know is contemplating suicide please call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or for help with depression or mental illness please visit Beyond Blue or Headspace.

 

 

 

RoseRandallImage2ATB EDIT      RoseRandall2

This episode was produced as part of the SYN Summer Series.

 

Episode Producer: Bec Fary

Presenters: Michael Brydon & Pip Rasmussen

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Music Credits: ‘Leafo Stills’ and ‘Beach Collage’ by Jai Leeworthy, ‘Frontier Psychiatrist’ by The Avalanches 

Image Credit: hitthatswitch 

Illustrations by Rose Randall

#1436 Blowing the Whistle

This week we work our way through the government’s changes to national security legislation, and zero in on one change that passed earlier this month – Section 35P of the ASIO Act. The change makes it illegal to disclose information about something called a ‘Special Intelligence Operation’ by ASIO. The problem for journalists is, these operations are declared in secret. So you won’t actually know whether or not you’re allowed to be reporting on it.

So what does that mean for journalists? What could it mean for whistleblowers? What does it mean for us?

The Case of Witness K

Is it so unbelievable to think that a government’s security interests and other interests could become interwoven and start to get muddled up? Well, not really, because it’s already happened.

Dr Clinton Fernandes is an Associate Professor of International Relations and Strategy at UNSW and spoke to Heidi Pett about the Timor Sea Oil Dispute and the case of Witness K.

Park Benches and ASIO in my emails

Mark Isaacs spnt nine months working for the Salvation Army in Australia’s Regional Processing Centre on Nauru. He was disappointed and horrified by what he saw, and eventually broke the confidentiality clause in his contract to write The Undesirables.  He met one of our Features EPs, Heidi Pett, on a park bench near central station because despite or even because of all the technological advances we’ve made, it’s still safer to meet in person. Also we love The Newsroom and would have met in a public library but they were all closed.

Who is Bill Toomer? 

Leona Hameed speaks to Kim Sawyer, an academic and former whistleblower, and sociologist Brian Martin about the history of whistleblowing in Australia. Do we have a culture of disclosure? What stops people from whistleblowing, apart from the law What are the best stories of whistleblowing in Australia? Everyone we spoke to for this piece mentioned the case of Bill Toomer, a quarantine officer who wanted to fumigate a ship. So we figured we’d find out why doing his job would be a reason for dismissal.

This episode was produced by Leona Hameed, Jess O’Callaghan and Heidi Pett.

Thanks to Emily HowiePaul Farrell, Tom Clarke and Dr Suelette Dreyfus for their help in pulling it together.

Presenters:  Michael Brydon 

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Kate Ter Haar

#1432 Borrowing Sugar

There’s a lot of mythology around neighbours. A good neighbour can turn into a very convenient friend, one who lends you a cup of sugar when you run out mid-bake, or who’ll water your plants when you’re out of town.

Then there are the neighbours who are a pair of eyes over a back fence, or a passive aggressive note stuck to your front door. The people who steal your newspaper subscription. The mysterious Boo Radley at the end of your street.

This episode we found out that when it comes to neighbours, the truth is much more interesting that fiction. Some of our listeners should probably move house. Or at least have quieter sex and parties.

 

All My Neighbours Are Dead

We’ve all had bad neighbours, right? The loud ones, the ones that are up all night playing awful guitar, the ones that host endless parties. Well Yasmin Parry moved house earlier this year and she thought  she’d scored the perfect place. It was big, with lots of light, in a good neighbourhood.

And it was quiet. Really quiet.

Produced by Yasmin Parry

Music Credits:

Danse Macabre (Dance of Death) by Camille Saint-Saëns, Get the Party Started by Pink, Smile Like You Mean it by Mika, Don’t Fear the Reaper by Blue Oyster Cult

 

Sex sounds, torn up trees and marriage

We asked for stories about your neighbours. Stories about people who really did fall in love with the girl or boy next door, current affair style feuding neighbours, and the neighbours you actually do borrow things from. Turns out most of you guys hate your neighbours.

 

Presenters: Michaela Morgan and Michael Brydon

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Johnny Ainsworth

#1416 That Girl

 

“I didn’t want to be That Girl Who Had An Abortion, because I’m not… When you look at the statistics, there are many of those girls”

We have so many conversations about abortion, but most of the time they’re abstract and political, they’re not about the lived experiences and choices of women who’ve terminated a pregnancy. A lot of the time it’s because those women are reluctant to put their head above the parapet. This week on All The Best we wanted to create a space for those conversations, a space for doubt, for relief, anger and even humour. A space for women’s stories.

Thanks to everyone to spoke to us for this episode – Dawn, Kerz, Jane, Gen and Heidi. You can hear all their stories in full, alongside extra stories on our blog.

 

Produced by Heidi Pett

Supervising Producer Kate Montague with assistance from Jess Bineth and Jess O’Callaghan

A special thanks to designer and illustrator Leah Goren for the use of her beautiful artwork.  There’s heaps more on her site.

Music Credits: ‘Cauliflower Jack’ by Caitlin Park, ‘How’s Your Wife?’ by Caitlin Park

Presenters: Michaela Morgan and Michael Brydon

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

#1415 Human – Live from the Sydney Writers’ Festival

You know, and we know, that the best stories are about people. On May 22 we invited five of our favourite people to tell us a story at the Sydney Writers’ Festival Club. Realising somebody is human after all, or that they’re only human. Humans being awful to each other, or excellent to each other. Cats acting human. In this episode of All the Best we bring you some of those stories – the rest can be heard in two weeks time in #1417 Human. You can see pictures of the night on our Facebook.

Belinda Lopez

What’s the name of the traveller that’s the opposite to your typical bogan, nationalistic, racist, obnoxious Aussie traveller? Belinda Lopez wonders, and travels.

Dan Nolan

Stories of hero animals, and why we view them as more human than humans.

Caitlin Park

A song about being bad at your job in a relationship. ‘Hunt for the Young’ is from Caitlin’s new album ‘The Sleeper’.

Presenters: Michaela Morgan and Michael Brydon 

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Pip Rasmussen

#1412 Squeezing the System

 

Ever think about where your $10 t-shirt came from? On the anniversary of the Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh, All The Best brings you stories from the supply chain.

Sumi Abedin is twenty years old. She was a garment worker at the Tazreen Fashions factory, and jumped from the building the day it caught fire in 2012. Emilia speaks to journalist and activist Lucy Seigle about what the Bangladesh Fire and Safety Accords mean, and how we can be ethical consumers. We hear from Ceridwen Filer, a former sourcing agent speaking out about her work for major Australian brands, and we talk to Carlie Ballard, an ethical designer who makes clothes that aren’t weird and asymmetrical or made out of hemp. That is, she makes ethical fashion that’s fashionable.

Plus, we’ve got a little extra this week: Avani Dias chats to model and freshly minted activist Ollie Henderson about #StartTheRiot, and the catcall that sparked the beginning of her very own fashion revolution.

Music: ‘Little Do’ by Podington Bear, ‘Fashion’ by David Bowie, ‘Highschool Lover’ by Air

Episode Producer: Emilia Terzon

Presenters: Michaela Morgan and Michael Brydon 

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producer: Giordana Caputo 

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

#1411 Morwell

Back in February one of the coal mines in Morwell caught fire. The entire town was covered in ash. Residents were told to evacuate, the council was giving out masks while the rest of the state worried that they would lose power.

Now, the fires are under control but its left the local community in a bit of a state and its time for the cleanup to begin.

This week, we talk to the residents of Morwell about the aftermath of the open cut mine fire.

Steve Szabo

The mine fire is all south of the train tracks that run through Morwell but the bushfire that sparked the disaster began just north of the tracks on Toners Lane near Steve Szabo’s Golf Driving range.

Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Deb Hollis

Deb Hollis is a mother and a carer for her autistic son. She talks to Sally Whyte about the ways the ash and smoke from the fire effected her family.

Produced by Sally Whyte

 

Simon Ellis

Simon Ellis watched the fires start from his veranda. He shows Sally where they came in, and tells her about the effect the fire has had on his life and family.

Produced by Sally Whyte

 

Councillor Christine Sindt

We travelled to  Morwell was the day the EPA said that the air quality was safe for residents to return. A lot of Morwell, especially south of the railway tracks, have relocated to neighbouring towns, or Melbourne. Councillor Christine Sindt was one of the many residents who evacuated South Morwell.

Produced by Sally Whyte

 

Friends of the Garden

Morwell might be covered in ash and smell like smoke, but it is still full of roses. On the roundabouts, in people’s front yards and in the town’s rose garden. Del Matthews, Elizabeth Stewart and Karen Cooper tell Michael that the mine fire may have had an unintended beneficiary.

Produced by Michael Brydon

 

Music credit: Clinging To The Almost by Bell Garden Orchestra

 

Supervising Producer: Sally Whyte

Presenters:  Michael Brydon and Michaela Morgan

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producers: Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Sally Whyte

 

#1406 These Women

Everyone can tell the story of an awesome woman. A mother, grandma, sister, friend, or teacher. This year International Women’s Day is celebrating women who inspire change, and today All the Best tells the stories of awesome women doing this in all sorts of ways. From a celebrant to a beekeeper, a journalist to young women sharing stories online, we look at the stories of Australian women.

Judy Aulich

Briefly, in December 2013, same-sex marriage was legalised in the Australian Capital Territory. Judy Aulich, a Canberra-based celebrant, performed 11 same sex marriage ceremonies in the five days it was legal. She tells that story to Farz Edraki, as well as some of the stranger weddings she’s performed in her time as a celebrant.

Produced by Farz Edraki

Music Credits: ‘Love is in the Air’ by John Paul Young, ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’ by ABBA, ‘Lovefool’ by Cardigans, ‘Son of a Preacher Man’ by Dusty Springfield, ‘Love Me Tender’ by Elvis Presley, ‘My Baby Just Cares for Me’ by Nina Simone

Creating Feminism

Feminism can sometimes seem like an exclusive club. Josie Wright looks at the ways that young women are making feminism more accessible, through creating, writing, and making.

Produced by Josie Wright

Uh huh honey

Melbourne City Rooftop Honey is a coalition of beekeepers who are introducing honeybees to the city in an effort to protect them from the ravages of disease and human habitation. Their honey is used and sold in restaurants across Melbourne. Vanessa showed us some of their hives nestled high above Federation Square in the CBD.

Produced by Leona Hameed

Music Credits: ‘Yeezus’ by Kanye West, ‘Sweet Nothings’ by Brenda Lee, ‘It’s Dope’ by J Dilla, ‘Slow Like Honey’ by Slow Like Honey, ‘The Birds and the Bees’ by Dean Martin

Woman to Woman

The next woman you’re going to hear from received a letter last year. She opened it standing in her kitchen, in the semi-darkness, after a long day of work. Joanne McCarthy, is journalist with the Newcastle Herald, a newspaper in the Hunter region on the New South Wales central coast. The letter was from another Australian woman, and it’s already become a celebrated part of Australian political history.

Produced by Jacqueline Breen

Presenters: Michaela Morgan and Michael Brydon 

Community Coordinator: Pip Rasmussen

Executive Producers: Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Features Executive Producers: Heidi Pett & Jess O’Callaghan

Image Credit: Rebecca O’Callaghan

#1348 Old & New

 

We are ending the year celebrating the people we love.  

From lovers to grandparents we hope you enjoy these stories.

Love Songs

We all know the deep, maddening love of the silver screen too well.  Those characters that laugh, cry, sing, dance and can’t live without their lovers!  But if you’re madly in love in real life, how do you truly express it?  Melbourne poet Izzy Roberts-Orr gives it a go in her poem ‘Love Songs’.

Writer:  Izzy Roberts-Orr

Producer:  Tess Lawley

Other links:  http://towerofwords.wordpress.com/

http://tesslawley.wordpress.com/2013/10/18/read-by-izzy-roberts-orr/

 

Grandpa Gerald

This is a personal account of one woman’s relationship with her grandfather and how it left her reeling when he passed away.  This story reminds of the magic that exists in the world.

Writer:  Katie Groneman

Producer:  Bryce Halliday

Composer/ Sound Design:  Bryce Halliday

 

Yiayia

Award winning performance poet Luka Lesson shares this story about his grandmother.  This story was recorded at the NSW Poetry Slam Final in 2013.

Writer/  Performer:  Luka Lesson

 

The Face of the One you Love:  Side A/ Side B

Side A/Side B was devised as a ten-minute tandem poetry meditation created by Sydney composer Tom Hogan and Brisbane poet Eleanor Jackson.

It was designed to be experienced by two people at the same time.   Side A/Side B asks that you take a seat, choose a side and conjure up the face of the one you love.

The installation originally sat two participants opposite each other, with “degradable sound” (tape or vinyl) on headphones. The two meditations are structured to move listeners through three distinct movements, using language and sound to create a hypnotic, contemplative place of love and loss.

Tom Hogan is a Sydney-based sound artist, composing for theatre and digital works. Eleanor Jackson is a Filipino Australian poet, performer, arts producer and radio broadcaster.

Writer/ Performer:  Eleanor Jackson

Composer/ Sound Designer:  Tom Hogan

Producer:  Tom Hogan

Technical Producer:  Rick O’Neil

Other links:  http://tomhogan.bandcamp.com/album/side-a-side-b

 

Music Credits: Whole Love by Wilco, Okada_s_Cat_2 by Tim Jenkins

 

Production Manager:  Carly-Ann Keneally

Executive Producer’s:  Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Feature’s Executive Producer:  Merran Winchester

 

#1345 …Vs The Establishment

What would you stand up and fight for?

Small Fry

‘ A warm man cannot understand a cold man’.

Barrister and Mediator Robin Margo was an activist during apartheid in South Africa.  He wanted to change the regime and fight for equality for all South Africans.  He campaigned alongside many passionate people.  However, it was an experience he shared with activist Steve Biko that has changed the way he now tries to relate to people.

Producer:  Zacha Rosen

Music Credits:  Delicate Particle Logic by Thomas Newman, Night Vision by Suzanne Vega, Unsquare Dance by Dave Brubeck, Sinnerman by Nina Simone, Crucify Your Mind by Sixto Rodriguez, Hidden in Snow by Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross

Other links:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00xqj1n

Not on My Turf

Not on My Turf was created as part of the multi-platform storytelling installation Transform My Turf.  

Millers Point is in the heart of Sydney and is a richly diverse community.  The public housing tenants are currently under threat of losing their homes as the Government makes room for a new, wealthy community to move in.  This documentary shares the stories of the public housing residents who’ve been living in Millers Point for generations.

Producer’s:  Carly-Ann Keneally & Jordan Byron

Sound Designer:  Oliver Pieterse

Supervising Producer: Kate Montague

Interviewee’s:  Chad Ford, Bob and Barney, Col and Terry, Flo Secold, Quentin Dempster, Alex Greenwich and Ron.

*Quentin Dempster was interviewed as a resident of Millers Point and his views do not reflect those of the ABC.

Music Credits: Our House by Madness

Other links:  http://www.transformyourturf.org.au/

Picture Credit:  Transform My Turf – Jordan Bryon

Music Credit:  Fight the Power by Public Enemy

Production Manager:  Carly-Ann Keneally

Executive Producer’s:  Belinda Lopez & Giordana Caputo

Feature’s Executive Producer:  Merran Winchester

#1334 Natural Composition

 

Nature has inspired Art since the beginning of time.

This episode we bring you stories inspired by nature and inspired for nature in the creation of music and art.  From the sensual mating of machines in the wild, to a musician’s love of permaculture, you’ll find an array of tales to provoke your imagination and senses.

 

Height of Passion by Tug Dumbly

Tug Dumbly is a writer, performer and poet, with a talent for language.  In this poem the miracle of nature unfolds before our ears as we are taken into the truly magical world of Jumbo Jets.

Playing for Permaculture

Charlie Mgee has hit the international scene as a singer/ songwriter performing at festivals all over the world.  What makes his work unique is his passion for permaculture and the environment.  This story leads you into the cool, fun and ethical world of Charlie Mgee and his music.

Producer:  Emily Woods

Music Credits:  Change by Charlie Mgee,  Small & Slow by Formidable Vegetable Sound System, No Such Thing as Waste by Formidable Vegetable Sound System, The Edge by Formidable Vegetable Sound System, Small & Slow by Formidable Vegetable Sound System, Oil by Formidable Vegetable Sound System, Limits by Formidable Vegetable Sound System, Yield by Formidable Vegetable Sound System

Other links:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSTFfKHJg4Y

 

How to Replace your Piano

‘Piano’s go missing all the time.’

But it’s not just the piano that’s missing.  Welcome to the music room where things are not as they seem.

Producer’s:  Zacha Rosen & Bryce Halliday

Writer & Narrator:  Zacha Rosen

Sound Design & Composition:  Bryce Halliday

 

Trees are People Too by Tug Dumbly

 

 

Picture Credit:  Moyan Brenn

 

Production Manager:  Carly-Ann Keneally

Executive Producer’s: Gioradana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Feature’s Executive Producer:  Merran Winchester

# 1333 Crossing Oceans

This episode we follow the stories of people who have crossed the ocean in search of a new home, a new beginning or adventure.   These stories will takes us from Africa to Australia, to Chile and Afghanistan.

 

From Africa, Home

Erin Rosenberg moved from South Africa with her family in 2005.   In this story she reflects on the challenges she faced establishing a new life in Melbourne and the love she has of her homeland South Africa.

Producer:   Erin Rosenberg

Supervising Producer:  Merran Winchester

Music Credits:  Shosholoza by the Drakensberg Boys Choir, Arms of Steel by Freshlyground, Jump One by Romain B.

 

In Detention

Anjali Vishwanathan met Ahmad-Ali-Jafari in Villawood Detention Centre when she went to speak with detainees about their experiences.  They shared stories, food and laughter.  Earlier this year Ahmad passed away in detention after suffering from a heart attack at the age of 22.    This story is a personal reflection and tribute to Ahmad-Ali-Jafari.

Writer & Narrator:  Anjali Vishwanathan

Producer’s:  Zacha Rosen & Merran Winchester

Sound Design:  Merran Winchester

Music Credits:  Loop Four by Seaworthy, Laceration by Kai Engel, Afghan Music Melody by Afghanistan Culture 09, Dil (A meaningful poem especially for Muslims) broadcast by Kashmala Ch.

Other Links:  http://overland.org.au/2013/08/eulogy-for-ahmad-ali-jafari/

 

Sea Hitchhiker

Zacha Rosen met Gabriel Salas to learn about his adventure crossing the Pacific Ocean on a balsa wood raft.   As a Chilean National, Gabriel left his country looking for an adventure.  What was originally going to be a road trip through South America turned into a history making voyage across the Ocean.  However, when he arrived in Australia a new political regime had begun in Chile and he realised he couldn’t go home.  He became one of the first Chilean refugees in Australia.  And if it wasn’t enough to cross the Pacific Ocean once in a lifetime, he managed to do it twice.

Producer:  Zacha Rosen

Music Credits: Jupiter The Blue by gillicuddy, Opening Doors by Jamie Evans, El barzón by Los Amparito,  Spring Rain by Aaron Ximm, Skitzin by Shining Bird

Other Links:  http://allthebestradio.com/blog/sea-hitchhiker/

* This story was originally broadcast in September 2012.  To find out more about the story go to

 

Production Manager:  Carly-Ann Keneally

Executive Producer’s:  Giordana Caputo & Belinda Lopez

Features Executive Producer:  Merran Winchester

 

#1234 The Scallywag and the Saint

Just in time for Christmas, All the Best brings you the story of a very unlikely pair of people— a nun and an ex-criminal— undertaking a very special project for those who face a festival season without love, family or presents. And we find out how the stories of your life could be preserved forever by the National Library of Australia through a new oral history project.

The Scallywag and the Saint
Sister Myree Harris and Vic Hitchcock are perhaps as different as two people could get. She’s a no-nonsense nun. He’s a larrikin ex-criminal. But the two of them work together every year to bring a bit of light to those who find Christmas to be the loneliest part of their year. As it turns out, their own story is something of a Christmas miracle.

Find out more about Sister Myree’s work here.

Produced by Kate Montague.
Music: ‘Indian Love Song’  and ‘Kim’s Dirt’ by The Dirty Three; ‘Writing Poems’ by Ludovico Einaudi, from ‘The Intouchables’ soundtrack; ‘Kolapot’ by Amiina; ‘Familiar Ground’ by Cinematic Orchestra.

This is Your Life
Host Georgia Moodie speaks to Nicole Curby from the Australian Generations oral history project about having your own life story preserved by the National Library of Australia for future generations. The project is seeks Australians from the country to the city, from families with a long history in Australia to the recently arrived, to share the stories of their lives.  The project is still looking for people born in the 1970s and 1980s, particularly men of this age!

Follow the project on Twitter, visit them on Facebook, and to participate, get in touch:

PHONE: (03) 9905 2206
EMAIL: kate.e.james@monash.edu
ONLINE: go to www.arts.monash.edu.au/australian‐generations and click on the orange headphones
WRITE: Australian Generations Oral History Project, Department of History, Building 11, Level 6, Monash University, Clayton Campus, VICTORIA 3800

Presenter: Georgia Moodie
Features Executive Producer: Belinda Lopez
Executive Producers: Giordana Caputo and Eliza Sarlos
Production Manager: Carly Anne Kenneally

Photo by Kate Montague